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dt <- data.table(X=rnorm(10),a=rep(0:1,length=10),b=rep(0:1,each=5))
dt
             X a b
1:  0.08848742 0 0
2: -1.36578648 1 0
3: -1.01563937 0 0
4:  0.36562936 1 0
5:  2.04250239 0 0
6:  1.33698124 1 1
7: -1.38358719 0 1
8: -0.14395236 1 1
9: -1.36277622 0 1
10:  0.40818281 1 1    

setkey(dt,a,b)
dt[J(1,1),]

This is a way to get all lines where both a and b are 1. Is there a way to pick those lines where either a or b is 1 ? In other words: to get all lines in dt except for line 1,3 and 5?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't think there's a direct way to do an OR operation. However, you can use simple logical equivalence (A OR B) == !(Ac and Bc) to deduce that what you need is !J(0, 0).

Just do:

dt[!J(0, 0)]

            X a b
1:  0.7768113 0 1
2:  0.2439950 0 1
3: -0.2095353 1 0
4:  2.9267934 1 0
5: -0.1437019 1 1
6:  1.5120883 1 1
7: -0.4462240 1 1
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I've been doing this sort of thing lately:

kvals = CJ(a=0:1,b=0:1)
dt[kvals[a|b]]

"kvals" stores all possible values for the key. CJ is the same as expand.grid, as far as I can tell: it takes all combinations of the vectors passed to it.

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Why can't you just do that as an ordinary i-selection operation?

> dt[a==1&b==1,]
            X a b
1: -0.1186037 1 1
2: -0.1166594 1 1
3:  0.2622407 1 1
> dt[a==1|b==1,]
             X a b
1: -0.69037968 0 1
2:  1.63492922 0 1
3: -0.09240386 1 0
4:  0.55300691 1 0
5: -0.11860370 1 1
6: -0.11665936 1 1
7:  0.26224070 1 1
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The OP was asking for joining, not subsetting. I guess they're the same thing if not using j in DT[i,j], though, right? –  Frank Aug 9 '13 at 16:13
1  
Well, sometimes the function or strategy requested is not the method that provides the desired answer. I was trying to return what was requested in natural language. –  BondedDust Aug 9 '13 at 16:34
1  
maybe OP is looking for speed? –  eddi Aug 9 '13 at 17:23
    
@DWin, vector scan is slower than binary search. See page 4 and page 5 here –  Arun Aug 9 '13 at 17:36
1  
I think you data.table aficionados are wasting a lot of time trying to always save milliseconds. How long did it take to conduct this conversation compared to either just using the obvious code for a one time extraction or creating an OR-ed variable and key on it if this were to be a recurring need. –  BondedDust Aug 9 '13 at 18:07

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