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We are seeing some behaviour that we can’t understand with the servicebus and deadletters, and wonder if someone can give us some insight into how the rules work.

If I create a topic with a TTL of 5 mins (‘LongTopic’) which has 2 subscriptions, ‘Long’ with a TTL of 5 mins as well and ‘Short’ with a TTL of 5 seconds and then send a test message to the topic, then what we see is that we don’t get a dead letter on ‘Short’ after 5 seconds, but do after about 1 minute. So it seems I can override the topic TTL with a shorter TTL, but this doesn’t necessarily mean it will be dead lettered immediately upon the TTL expiring.

If I create a topic with a TTL of 5 seconds (‘ShortTopic’) which has 2 subscriptions, ‘Long’ with a TTL of 5 mins as well and ‘Short’ with a TTL of 5 seconds and then send a test message to the topic, then what we see is that we don’t get a dead letter on ‘Short’ after 5 seconds, but do after about 1 minute, and we also get a deadlettered message on the ‘Long’ after about a minute as well. So it seems I can’t override the topic TTL with a longer TTL in the subscription but again this doesn’t necessarily mean it will be dead lettered immediately upon the TTL expiring.

We have had topics with much longer TTL (3000 days) and sometimes we see messages which are not being forwarded from a subscription which are not deadlettering for 1.5hours despite the TTL on the subscription being 1 minute.

Does anyone have any idea if this is expected behaviour? Or have a link to the rules about when a message might be dead lettered?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you set the dead letter info on a message, that tells Service Bus when a message should move to the dead letter queue or be completed (aka deleted)-- the choice depends on whether or not dead lettering is enabled on the queue or subscription. If you have an active receiver on the queue or subscription, then the dead letter time will match the dead letter interval within a few seconds. When you are just sending messages, the system runs with a background task that checks the queue or subscription on a regular cadence. As you have discovered experimentally, this check happens every 60s.

Your next question is likely "why doesn't this behave the way I want it to?" The Service Bus has been designed with a large number of optimizations to make sure that all messages are sent durably and that sends and receives happen as fast as possible. This means that we spend a lot of engineering time to be durable and fast for the primary scenarios- send/receive/browse messages.

The behavior you are seeing, which we call "proactive TTL", is actually quite new. It was first introduced into the Windows Azure Service in April 2013. Prior to this time, a user would have to actively receive on a queue or subscription in order to force the bookkeeping code to run.

At this time, you will not see the proactive TTL behavior for lightly used queues and subscriptions. If you have a message that expires in > 2 hours, that message won't move into the dead letter queue because the timer does not run on what are "idle entities". When the Service Bus is seeing an unusually high amount of usage, this window can shrink considerably-- as low as a 2 minute idle time on your entity will cause the proactive TTL timer to stop running.

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