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I have this Base class:

class Base
{
    public $extA;
    public $extB;

    function __construct()
    {

    }

    public function Init()
    {
        $this->extA = new ExtA();
        $this->extB = new ExtB( $this );
    }

    public function Test()
    {
        return 'Base Test Here!';
    }
}

class ExtA extending the Base Class

class ExtA extends Base
{
    public function Test()
    {
        return 'ExtA Test Here!';
    }
}

class ExtB extending the Base Class too

class ExtB extends Base
{
    private $base;

    public function __construct( $base )
    {
        $this->base = $base;
    }

    public function Test()
    {
        return 'ExtB calling ExtA->Test()::' . $this->base->extA->Test();
    }
}


$base = new Base();
$base->Init();

var_dump( $base->Test() );
var_dump( $base->extA->Test() );
var_dump( $base->extB->Test() );

I try to call the ExtA class Test() function from the ExtB, both of ExtA and ExtB is exnteding the Base class. My question is : is this ok, or have a better, faster solution for this?

The extends is necessary too? Or simply enough like this

class ExtA
{
     ...
}
class ExtB
{
     ...
}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
You have some very strange dependencies here. Are you trying to do inheritance? –  Halcyon Aug 9 '13 at 15:25
    
In theory this works in a way... It depends on your desired behaviour if it is functioning well. The extend for class B is necessary, the extend for class A isn't. –  RichardBernards Aug 9 '13 at 15:37
    
@Frits van Campen sorry i dont understand, how should i do inheritance? –  Warloxk Aug 9 '13 at 15:37
    
@user2668398 By using extends and implements. Look at a OOP tutorial for PHP. –  Halcyon Aug 9 '13 at 15:38
2  
It is totally pointless to implement a mechanism without a problem. Show your real problem, and we can point you out a solution [let it either be inheritance, interface...]. Nevertheless, your approach is at the very least curious. –  moonwave99 Aug 16 '13 at 19:56

1 Answer 1

This is weird way of OOP. The Base class should not know anything about its children so we shall go more correct way. Let's implement Decorator pattern:

interface IExt
{
    public function test();
}

abstract class ExtDecorator implements IExt
{
    protected $instance;

    public function __construct(IExt $ext)
    {
        $this->instance = $ext;
    }
}

class ExtA extends ExtDecorator
{
    public function test()
    {
        return 'ExtA::test here and calling... ' . $this->instance->test();
    }
}


class ExtB extends ExtDecorator
{
    public function test()
    {
        return 'ExtB::test is here and calling... ' . $this->instance->test();
    }
}

class Base implements IExt
{
    public function test()
    {
        return 'Base::test here!';
    }
}

class Printer
{
    public static function doMagic(IExt $ext)
    {
        echo $ext->test()."\n";
    }
}


Printer::doMagic($base = new Base); 
// Base::test here!
Printer::doMagic($extA = new ExtA($base)); 
// ExtA::test here and calling... Base::test here!
Printer::doMagic(new ExtB($extA)); 
// ExtB::test is here and calling... ExtA::test here and calling... Base::test here!

You can play further any way you want

share|improve this answer
1  
What's the point of using a decorator and then extending it? Just extend the base class, you should not add complexity layers without any concrete reason imho. –  moonwave99 Aug 16 '13 at 19:58
    
May be you're right. At first glance I thought about that too but probably topic starter wanted something more than calling parent::test() –  kryoz Aug 16 '13 at 21:19

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