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I have a list of numbers that I want to reverse.

They are already sorted.

35 53 102 342

I want this:

342 102 53 35

So I thought of this:

echo $NUMBERS | ??? | tac | xargs

What's the ???

It should turn a space separated list into a line separated list.

I'd like to avoid having to set IFS.

Maybe I can use bash arrays, but I was hoping there's a command whose purpose in life is to do the opposite of xargs (maybe xargs is more than a one trick pony as well!!)

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8 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use printf for that. For example:

$ printf "%s\n" 35 53 102 342
35
53
102
342
$ printf "%s\n" 35 53 102 342|tac
342
102
53
35
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Wow. that is what I call a pleasant surprise. –  Steven Lu Aug 9 '13 at 15:30
2  
Would be better to use %s, so that it won't break if the number contains a decimal point or is too large. –  mark4o Aug 9 '13 at 15:49
    
@mark4o: hadn't thought about that at all, thanks for the tip. –  Mat Aug 9 '13 at 15:54
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awk one-liner without tac:

awk '{NF++;while(NF-->1)print $NF}'

for example:

kent$  echo "35 53 102 342"|awk '{NF++;while(NF-->1)print $NF}'
342
102
53
35
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Another option is to use Bash string manipulation

$ numbers="35 53 102 342"
$ echo "${numbers// /$'\n'}"
35
53
102
342
$ echo "${numbers// /$'\n'}" | tac
342
102
53
35
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Well, you could write:

echo $(printf '%s\n' $NUMBERS | tac)

where printf '%s\n' ... prints each of ..., with a newline after each one, and $( ... ) is a built-in feature that makes xargs almost superfluous.

However, I don't think you should avoid using arrays, IFS, and so on; they make scripts more robust in the face of bugs and/or unexpected input.

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There's a lot of answers using tac, but in case you'd like to use sort, it's almost the same:

printf "%s\n" 1 2 3 4 5 10 12 | sort -rn

n is important as it makes it sort numerically. r is reverse.

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If you have sorted your list with sort, you might considered the -r reversed option

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Another way to change space into newlines and the other way round is with tr :

echo 35 53 102 342|tr ' ' '\n'|tac|tr '\n' ' '

If data is not sorted, replace tac by sort -rn.

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Oh! clever..... –  Steven Lu Aug 10 '13 at 17:58
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Another answer (easy to remember but not as fast as the printf method):

$ xargs -n 1 echo

e.g.

$ NUMBERS="35 53 102 342"
$ echo $NUMBERS | xargs -n 1 echo | tac | xargs
342 102 53 35
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