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When I compile this code:

class Base { /*...*/ };
class Derived : public Base { /*...*/ };

class C
{
public:
    template<typename T>
    C(T const& inBase) : baseInC(new T(inBase)) { /*...*/ }

    template<typename T>
    C(T&& inBase) : baseInC(new T(std::move(inBase))) { /*...*/ }

    std::unique_ptr<Base> baseInC;
};

int main()
{
    Base base;
    Derived derived;

    C ca(base);
    C cb(derived);

    C cc( (Base()) );
    C cd( (Derived()) );

    return 0;
}

I get a the compiler message:

In instantiation of C::C(T&&) [with T = Base&]': required from C ca(base); error: new cannot be applied to a reference type

In instantiation of C::C(T&&) [with T = Derived&]': required from C cb(derived); error: new cannot be applied to a reference type

It looks like C ca(base); is being associated with the rvalue reference ctor call. Why is the compiler having difficulty associating this line with the first ctor? The construction of cc and cd works as expected if I comment out the offending lines.

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4  
Read up on universal references. –  Xeo Aug 9 '13 at 16:08
1  
    
In written form here isocpp.org/blog/2012/11/… –  Fadecomic Aug 9 '13 at 18:38
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you're going to copy or move anyway, pass by value. In a simplified way:

template <typename T>
void foo(T x)
{
    T * p = new T(std::move(x));
}

Otherwise, if you have a universal reference like template <typename T> ... T &&, you can get the base type as typename std::decay<T>::type (from <type_traits>). In that case, you should pass the argument as std::forward<T>(inBase).

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Hmm. This doesn't seem to work for the temporaries, though. If I put a print statement in the ctor, nothing is printed in the lines C cc( (Base()) ); and C cd( (Derived()) );. –  Fadecomic Aug 9 '13 at 16:23
    
@Fadecomic In other words, that's a good thing! –  Sebastian Redl Aug 9 '13 at 16:26
    
Ah nevermind. It was the MVP problem. I put the extra parentheses in in my question, but not in my actual code. Oops. @Sebastian Redi: Why is that a good thing? I want the code to make a copy of the temps locally. Isn't that a pretty safe thing to do? –  Fadecomic Aug 9 '13 at 16:31
    
@Fadecomic: Works as expected for me. –  Kerrek SB Aug 9 '13 at 16:33
    
@Fadecomic Whenever the compiler elides a copy, that's a good thing. It will never do it when it's unsafe. In general, when a temp is elided, it's because the object is constructed directly in its final location. –  Sebastian Redl Aug 9 '13 at 16:39
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overloading on universal reference is a bad idea( see Scott Meyer's recent talk ).

C ca(base);
C cb(derived);

these will call the templated universal reference constructor because universal reference binds to everything, and since base and derived is not passed in as a const &, it will not bind to the first constructor. Instead the compiler deduced the template argument to be Base & && and Derived & && and after reference collapsing rule you get Base & and Derived & which ultimately invoke the error.

C cc( (Base()) );
C cd( (Derived()) );

these work because temporary can only bind to const & thus the first constructor is a better match.

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2  
Here's the talk in question: youtube.com/watch?v=T5swP3dr190 –  Sebastian Redl Aug 9 '13 at 16:26
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