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I'm using sqlalchemy's ORM and I have a bunch of Declarative classes that with class attributes. For instance:

class Example(Declarative):
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    datum = Column(String(65))

Naturally, my classes are much longer than this example and I have about two dozen. I'd like to be able to populate their fields at instantiation time, so it would be nice to have __init__ functions for each class.

The naive way to do this is as follows:

    def __init__(self, id, datum):
        self.id = id
        self.datum = datumi

This gets very tedious. Is there some sort of shortcut? Perhaps I can exploit Example.__dict__? These are new-style classes.

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Perhaps something like the solution to this might be useful: stackoverflow.com/questions/5227839/… –  Alex Aug 9 '13 at 16:20
    
@Alex, maybe I'm missing something obvious, but I don't see how this would simplify anything. Does this work with __init__? –  blz Aug 9 '13 at 16:24
    
SQLAlchemy already provides you with a __init__, why create your own? –  Martijn Pieters Aug 9 '13 at 16:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't need to create a __init__ method at all; SQLAlchemy provides you with one out of the box.

Even if you did have to build one, you could just accept arbitrary keyword arguments. That is just what the SQLAlchemy version does:

def _declarative_constructor(self, **kwargs):
    """A simple constructor that allows initialization from kwargs.

    Sets attributes on the constructed instance using the names and
    values in ``kwargs``.

    Only keys that are present as
    attributes of the instance's class are allowed. These could be,
    for example, any mapped columns or relationships.
    """
    cls_ = type(self)
    for k in kwargs:
        if not hasattr(cls_, k):
            raise TypeError(
                "%r is an invalid keyword argument for %s" %
                (k, cls_.__name__))
        setattr(self, k, kwargs[k])

Translated into prose, this method tests if each and every keyword you pass in is an attribute on the class before using setattr() to set the value on the instance.

Note that this uses keyword arguments; you could not do this with positional arguments, because your class attributes are stored in a dictionary and thus have no set order. If you want to use positional arguments, you need to manually create an __init__ method, or define an order on the class for an (inherited) __init__ to make use of:

class Example(Declarative):
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    datum = Column(String(65))
    __order__ = ('id', 'datum')

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        cls_ = type(self)
        kwargs.update(zip(cls_.__order__, args))
        for k in kwargs:
            if not hasattr(cls_, k):
                raise TypeError(
                    "%r is an invalid keyword argument for %s" %
                    (k, cls_.__name__))
            setattr(self, k, kwargs[k])

Here, any positional args are merged into kwargs given a stored field order in a new __order__ attribute on the class.

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I'll be damned. So I can do Example(9001, 'hello, world') without implementing my own constructor? –  blz Aug 9 '13 at 16:34
    
Almost. You can do Example(id=9001, datum='hello, world') without implementing your own constructor. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 9 '13 at 16:35
    
Good enough for me! Thanks for your answer! –  blz Aug 9 '13 at 16:39
    
In Python 3, it would also be possible to overwrite __prepare__() on the metaclass and use an OrderedDict for the class namespace. (Not that I'd recommend doing so -- metaclasses are so overused that I developed an allergy against them.) –  Sven Marnach Aug 9 '13 at 16:56

You could define a class that takes a dictionary as an input and does something like:

for (k, v) in inital_dict.iteritems():
    setattr(self, k, v)

If you inherited from that class all your new classes would have the same method and you could invoke it with super.

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