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This example of a stacked-to-grouped bar transition is beautiful. However, it's functioning off of a random number generator and for the life of me, I cannot figure how to replace that with my own data set.

http://bl.ocks.org/mbostock/3943967

How do get this stacked-to-grouped bar transition to import and work with a .csv file instead of the random data generator?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<style>

body {
  font: 14px sans-serif;
}

.axis path,
.axis line {
  fill: none;
  stroke: #000;
  shape-rendering: crispEdges;
}

.x.axis path {
  display: none;
}

form {
  position: absolute;
  right: 10px;
  top: 10px;
}

</style>

<form>
  <label><input type="radio" name="mode" value="grouped"> Grouped</label>
  <label><input type="radio" name="mode" value="stacked" checked> Stacked</label>
</form>

<script src="http://d3js.org/d3.v3.min.js"></script>

<script>

var margin = {top: 20, right: 20, bottom: 30, left: 40},
    width = 1000 - margin.left - margin.right,
    height = 400 - margin.top - margin.bottom;

var stack = d3.layout.stack(),
    layers = stack(d3.range(n).map(function() { return bumpLayer(m, .1); })),
    yGroupMax = d3.max(layers, function(layer) { return d3.max(layer, function(d) { return d.y; }); }),
    yStackMax = d3.max(layers, function(layer) { return d3.max(layer, function(d) { return d.y0 + d.y; }); });

var x = d3.scale.ordinal()
    .rangeRoundBands([0, width], .1);

var y = d3.scale.linear()
    .rangeRound([height, 0]);

var color = d3.scale.ordinal()
    .range(["#aa0000", "#ffff66", "#99ff99", "#00aa00"]);

var xAxis = d3.svg.axis()
    .scale(x)
    .tickSize(0)
    .tickPadding(6)
    .orient("bottom");

var svg = d3.select("body").append("svg")
    .attr("width", width + margin.left + margin.right)
    .attr("height", height + margin.top + margin.bottom)
  .append("g")
    .attr("transform", "translate(" + margin.left + "," + margin.top + ")");

d3.csv("data.csv", function(error, data) {
  color.domain(d3.keys(data[0]).filter(function(key) { return key !== "Year"; }));

  data.forEach(function(d) {
    var y0 = 0;
    d.power = color.domain().map(function(name) { return {name: name, y0: y0, y1: y0 += +d[name]}; });
    d.total = d.power[d.power.length - 1].y1;
  });

  data.sort(function(b, a) { return b.total - a.total; });

  x.domain(data.map(function(d) { return d.Year; }));
  y.domain([0, d3.max(data, function(d) { return d.total; })]);

  svg.append("g")
      .attr("class", "x axis")
      .attr("transform", "translate(0," + height + ")")
      .call(xAxis);

  svg.append("g")
      .attr("class", "y axis")
      .call(yAxis)
    .append("text")
      .attr("y", -8)
      .attr("x", 40)
      .attr("dy", "0em")
      .style("text-anchor", "end")
      .text("Power (Mw)");

  var year = svg.selectAll(".year")
      .data(data)
    .enter().append("g")
      .attr("class", "g")
      .attr("transform", function(d) { return "translate(" + x(d.Year) + ",0)"; });

  year.selectAll("rect")
      .data(function(d) { return d.power; })
    .enter().append("rect")
      .attr("width", x.rangeBand())
      .attr("y", function(d) { return y(d.y1); })
      .attr("height", function(d) { return y(d.y0) - y(d.y1); })
      .style("fill", function(d) { return color(d.name); });

  var legend = svg.selectAll(".legend")
      .data(color.domain().slice().reverse())
    .enter().append("g")
      .attr("class", "legend")
      .attr("transform", function(d, i) { return "translate(0," + i * 20 + ")"; });

  legend.append("rect")
      .attr("x", width - 800)
      .attr("width", 18)
      .attr("height", 18)
      .style("fill", color);

  legend.append("text")
      .attr("x", width - 770)
      .attr("y", 9)
      .attr("dy", ".35em")
      .style("text-anchor", "begin")
      .text(function(d) { return d; });

});

  rect.transition()
    .delay(function(d, i) { return i * 10; })
    .attr("y", function(d) { return y(d.y0 + d.y); })
    .attr("height", function(d) { return y(d.y0) - y(d.y0 + d.y); });

  svg.append("g")
    .attr("class", "x axis")
    .attr("transform", "translate(0," + height + ")")
    .call(xAxis);

d3.selectAll("input").on("change", change);

var timeout = setTimeout(function() {
  d3.select("input[value=\"grouped\"]").property("checked", true).each(change);
}, 2000);

function change() {
  clearTimeout(timeout);
  if (this.value === "grouped") transitionGrouped();
  else transitionStacked();
}

function transitionGrouped() {
  y.domain([0, yGroupMax]);

  rect.transition()
      .duration(500)
      .delay(function(d, i) { return i * 10; })
      .attr("x", function(d, i, j) { return x(d.x) + x.rangeBand() / n * j; })
      .attr("width", x.rangeBand() / n)
    .transition()
      .attr("y", function(d) { return y(d.y); })
      .attr("height", function(d) { return height - y(d.y); });
}

function transitionStacked() {
  y.domain([0, yStackMax]);

  rect.transition()
      .duration(500)
      .delay(function(d, i) { return i * 10; })
      .attr("y", function(d) { return y(d.y0 + d.y); })
      .attr("height", function(d) { return y(d.y0) - y(d.y0 + d.y); })
    .transition()
      .attr("x", function(d) { return x(d.x); })
      .attr("width", x.rangeBand());
}

</script>
share|improve this question
    
It would be helpful if you could provide your current attempt either in your question or in a JS Fiddle (jsfiddle.net). –  ne8il Aug 9 '13 at 17:40
    
I believe the issue is in: var stack = d3.layout.stack(), layers = stack(d3.range(n).map(function() { return bumpLayer(m, .1); })), yGroupMax = d3.max(layers, function(layer) { return d3.max(layer, function(d) { return d.y; }); }), yStackMax = d3.max(layers, function(layer) { return d3.max(layer, function(d) { return d.y0 + d.y; }); }); The bumpLayer was defined in the initial random data generator. I don't understand how this bit of code works though in defining the layers. –  Lokitez Aug 9 '13 at 18:01

3 Answers 3

I think you might be missing a level in your data. It looks like data in your example is an array of objects. But in Mike's example he's using an array of arrays of objects:

[
   [{x:, y:}, {x:, y:},...],
   [{x:, y:}, {x:, y:},...],
   ...
]

The first level in the array is the "layers", which represent the number of bars in each stack or group. There is a <g> element created per layer that will contain all 58 bars in that layer.

The second level in the array represents the bars themselves within each layer.

You are probably going to have a difficult time representing this structure as a CSV. You might be better off storing the data on the server as JSON. If you need to use CSV for some reason you'll need to figure out how to represent the inner array without using commas. One option is to add a column called "layer" and assign a layer index value to each row/object that can be used to turn the flat CSV data into a nested array on the client.

share|improve this answer
    
I will try JSON. I don't have a specific data set right now, so I'm not tied to CSV. I'm just trying to learn how to make use of this stacked-to-grouped transition. –  Lokitez Aug 10 '13 at 3:30

Old question, but been working on the same problem; hope this helps someone. Really just expanding on what Scott responded with below. Mike Bostock, this is some amazing work BTW.

1) Comment out the current layers array that is generated using the test generator functions (you can also delete/comment-out the test generator functions)

2) Here is a simple example of what a new nested layers array would look like:

layers = [
            [
                {"x":0,"y":1.5,"y0":0}
            ],
            [
                {"x":0,"y":1.5,"y0":1.5}
            ]
        ];

3) Whatever data you use, you still need to someone populate the n [# of layers/columns per sample period] and m [number of samples total OR number of periods] variables to match the array(s) that you loaded into layers

4) y0 governs the difference between the array[0] and array[1] for the stacking view - haven't quite figured out how function(d) returns the values needed for y0 so working around it with my source data for now

5) As you start adding new periods or what Mike calls "samples" in the comments, you group each "layer" in the separate period array (which is equal to the number of layers you are plotting). Notice how y0 is just the aggregation of all the prior y coordinates. Example for n = 4, m=2:

layers = [ [ {"x":0,"y":0.5,"y0":0}, {"x":1,"y":1.5,"y0":0} ], [ {"x":0,"y":2.5,"y0":0.5}, {"x":1,"y":1.5,"y0":1.5} ], [ {"x":0,"y":0.5,"y0":3.0}, {"x":1,"y":1.5,"y0":3.0} ], [ {"x":0,"y":2.5,"y0":3.5}, {"x":1,"y":1.5,"y0":4.5} ] ];

share|improve this answer

Let us assume this is your json data:

[ {"a":"uno", "b":11, "c":21}, {"a":"duo", "b":12, "c":22}, {"a":"tre", "b":13, "c":23} ]

The structure of array layers is then as follows:

[ [ {x:"uno", y:11, y0:0}, {x:"duo", y:12, y0:0}, {x:"tre", y:13, y0:0} ], [ {x:"uno", y:21, y0:11}, {x:"duo", y:22, y0:12}, {x:"tre", y:23, y0:13} ] }

The two inner arrays correspond to the two layers in the graph.

To properly transform the data from json to stack, you need to go layer by layer. It the code below, cats is an array containing the names of the groups or categories ["uno", "duo", "tre"] and m is their number(3); vals is an array of layer labels ["b", "c"] and n is their number (2). The function readLayer gets called twice, once per layer.

var stack = d3.layout.stack(),
layers = stack(d3.range(n).map(function(i) { return readLayer(m,i);})),
yGroupMax = d3.max(layers, function(layer) { return d3.max(layer, function(d) { return d.y;});}),
yStackMax = d3.max(layers, function(layer) { return d3.max(layer, function(d) { return d.y0 + d.y;});});

function readLayer(m,r){
    var a = [], i; 
    for (i = 0; i < m; ++i) { a[i] = data[i][vals[r]]; }
    return a.map(function(d, i) { return {x: cats[i], y: a[i]};});
};

Please note that the value y0 is not returned by readLayer; it gets created in the stack function.

share|improve this answer

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