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I have this but the subprocess reading from pipe at the end hangs:

$cat waitforinput.sh
#!/bin/sh


while read line
do
echo $line
done                    


>>> p1 = subprocess.Popen(["/home/abc/waitforinput.sh", "-v"], shell=True, executable=None,stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
>>> 
>>> 
>>> p1.stdin.write('This is a good idea\n')
>>> p1.stdin.write('This is a good idea\n')
>>> p1.stdin.write('This is a good idea\n')
>>> p1.stdin.write('This is a good idea\n')
>>> p1.stdin.write('This is a good idea\n')
>>> 
>>> 
>>> p1.stdin.flush()
>>> 
>>> for i in p1.stdout:
...     print i 
... 

What should I do so that it does not hang?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of flush(), call p1.stdin.close().

...
p1.stdin.write('This is good idea\n')
p1.stdin.write('This is good idea\n')

p1.stdin.close()

for i in p1.stdout:
    print i

UPDATE

Replace stdout-iteration with while-loop with stdout.readline()

Refer python manpage -u part:

Force stdin, stdout and stderr to be totally unbuffered. On systems where it matters, also put stdin, stdout and stderr in binary mode. Note that there is internal buffering in xread‐ lines(), readlines() and file-object iterators ("for line in sys.stdin") which is not influenced by this option. To work around this, you will want to use "sys.stdin.readline()" inside a "while 1:" loop.

p1.stdin.flush()

while True:
    line = p1.stdout.readline()
    if not line:
        break
    print line

You will get output, but without close(), the script will not end. Anyway you should use close().

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1  
@abc, As far as I know, buffer is not flushed until pipe size met. (Check pipe size in ulimit -a) –  falsetru Aug 9 '13 at 18:30
1  
@abc, -v is not interpreted by shell. That should be handled by script. Something like *, $HOSTNAME, .. are substituted by shell. –  falsetru Aug 9 '13 at 18:34
1  
@abc, The documentation is right. I think you interpret treated as additional shell arguments differently. –  falsetru Aug 9 '13 at 18:37
1  
Of course a much simpler solution is to just call communicate. If you're just going to do all your writing, then close stdin, then do all your reading, it already does that for you. If you're trying to do something more complicated than communicate can do, you will need to do all the stuff it does with background threads, plus all the stuff it doesn't do with managing the pipe buffers. –  abarnert Aug 9 '13 at 18:45
1  
You can only call communicate once. You gather all your input, send it all at once, and get back the results all at once as a big string, and then the child process is done. When you need to stream data a little bit a time, this doesn't work. But in your case, your original problem is that you don't have enough data to stream it a little bit at a time anyway, so there's no real downside to rewriting around communicate. –  abarnert Aug 9 '13 at 19:07

The problem is that waitforinput.sh is buffering its output. falsetru's solution works because the close causes the script to exit and that flushes its output buffers. This is the normal way to handle pipelined commands.

If you want the output interactively, you can use the pty module or pexpect to trick the script into thinking that it is writing to a terminal. Then, its output will only be line buffered.

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