Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to get the concepts of returning a value from a pthread, and catching that value, but I cannot understand what is going on, or how to make it work. I have this simple program that creates a single thread, this thread exits with int value 100, and then I try to catch that value with pthread_join:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <pthread.h>

void *doStuff(void *param) {
    int a = 100;
    pthread_exit(a);
}

void main() {
    pthread_t thread;
    int a;
    pthread_create(&thread, NULL, doStuff, NULL);
    pthread_join(thread, &a);
    printf("%d\n", a);
}

It works, but throws off a few warnings:

./teste.c: In function ‘doStuff’:
./teste.c:7:2: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘pthread_exit’ makes pointer from integer without a cast [enabled by default]
In file included from ./teste.c:2:0:
/usr/include/pthread.h:241:13: note: expected ‘void *’ but argument is of type ‘int’
./teste.c: In function ‘main’:
./teste.c:17:2: warning: passing argument 2 of ‘pthread_join’ from incompatible pointer type [enabled by default]
In file included from ./teste.c:2:0:
/usr/include/pthread.h:249:12: note: expected ‘void **’ but argument is of type ‘int *’

I don't understand why I'm getting those warnings, and honestly I don't understand why this is working either, because I thought I had to return a void pointer on pthread_exit.

This is a simple example that I'm trying to get to work so that I'm able to finish another program that I'm trying to create, in which I will have an array of threads, each of them calculating a single float value, and I want to store each of those calculated values into an array of floats using pthread_exit and pthread_join, but I don't really know how to store the values from pthread_join into an array.

share|improve this question
2  
"I don't understand why I'm getting those warnings" - because int is not void *, perhaps? –  user529758 Aug 9 '13 at 18:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

pthread_exit takes a void*, not an int. (Note that calling pthread_exit(x) is the same as simply returning x from your thread function.)

The simplest fix for your issue is to pass the thread function a pointer to int in which to store the produced value:

void *doStuff(void *param) {
    int a = 100;
    *(int*)param = a;
    return NULL;
}

int main(void) {
    pthread_t thread;
    int a;
    pthread_create(&thread, NULL, doStuff, &a);
    pthread_join(thread, NULL);
    printf("%d\n", a);
}

EDIT: If you really need to use the return value of the thread function as to communicate the result, you have a couple of options.

(1) cast the return value in and out of void*:

void *doStuff(void *param) {
    int a = 100;
    return (void*)a;
}

int main(void) {
    pthread_t thread;
    void* ptr;
    int a;
    pthread_create(&thread, NULL, doStuff, &a);
    pthread_join(thread, &ptr);
    a = (int)ptr;
    printf("%d\n", a);
}

This feels a bit hackish, because it is. If you are certain that casting to-and-from void* will preserve the value of an int on every platform you will ever target, then by all means cast away.

(2) Return a pointer to dynamically allocated storage containing the return value:

void *doStuff(void *param) {
    int a = 100;
    int* ptr = malloc(sizeof(*ptr));
    assert(ptr); /* I'm lazy, sue me. */
    *ptr = a;
    return ptr;
}

int main(void) {
    pthread_t thread;
    void* ptr;
    int a;
    pthread_create(&thread, NULL, doStuff, &a);
    pthread_join(thread, &ptr);
    a = *(int*)ptr;
    free(ptr);
    printf("%d\n", a);
}

(3) Make a structure to encapsulate all the in/out parameters of your thread (Heavyweight, but nicely explicit):

struct foo {
  int input1;
  int input2;
  int result;
};

void *doStuff(void *param) {
    foo* f = param;
    int a = f->input1 + f->input2;
    f->result = a;
    return f;
}

int main(void) {
    pthread_t thread;
    foo *ptr;
    void* voidp;
    int a;

    ptr = malloc(sizeof(*ptr));
    assert(ptr);
    ptr->input1 = 5;
    ptr->input2 = 3;

    pthread_create(&thread, NULL, doStuff, ptr);
    pthread_join(thread, &voidp);

    ptr = (foo*)voidp;
    printf("%d\n", ptr->result);
    free(voidp);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, in this case this is a valid solution, but for the main program I'm working on, I'm already using pthread_create to pass the threads an array of values to be worked on. Is there any other way for me to catch the values returned by all threads? –  Gustavo Danilo Machado Aug 9 '13 at 18:54
    
@GustavoDaniloMachado Yes; edited into answer. –  Casey Aug 9 '13 at 19:10
    
It is not wrong to pass an int as the return of a pthread, you just need to make the proper cast. This will not work 100% if sizeof(void *) < sizeof(int), witch I doubt to be true in any platform, don´t know if the standard says something about this. Pass the address of a local variable is not always possible, and should not be recommended. –  Jonatan Goebel Aug 9 '13 at 19:33
1  
@JonatanGoebel This falls in the area of "things I expect are true of all reasonable implementations but may not be guaranteed by the standard". From N1570: 6.3.2.3/5 and /6 specify int-to-pointer and pointer-to-int conversions (respectively) as being implementation-defined. AFAIK, the only integer types for which the standard guarantees that int-to-pointer-to-int produces the same result are intptr_t and uintptr_t (7.20.1.4/1) which are optional. Honestly, I'd file a bug report for any implementation that didn't preserve the value in int-to-pointer-to-int conversions. –  Casey Aug 9 '13 at 20:00
    
Footnote 67 says "The mapping functions for converting a pointer to an integer or an integer to a pointer are intended to be consistent with the addressing structure of the execution environment." Footnotes are non-normative, but this does indicate that implementations are strongly encouraged to support int-to-void*-to-int conversions. –  Casey Aug 9 '13 at 20:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.