Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am posting to an API that may return either 1 of the following 2 formats of JSON strings:

{
"MessageType": 6,
"Message": "Unable to SAVE new record. Invalid posted data."
}

or

{
"Model": {
    "Id": "1-6Q0RZ9",
    ...

         },   
"ResponseResult": {
    "MessageType": 10,
    "Message": "Successfully saved, Record Id = 1-6Q0RZ9"
                  }
}

I need to retrieve the results from MessageType and have tried every if condition I can think of to read the results, because the syntax or retrieving the key:value is different for each JSON string, and there are no other flags to trigger one or the other. So the code I used is:

string result = eml.PostData("API/Save", dataJSON.ToString());
var returnresult = new JavaScriptSerializer().Deserialize<dynamic>(result);
try {
  var responseresults = returnresult["ResponseResult"];
  rr = responseresults["MessageType"];
  rrtxt = responseresults["Message"];
} catch (Exception ex) {
  rr = returnresult["MessageType"];
  rrtxt = returnresult["Message"];
}

Which works great. If there is a valid Db post it returns the second JSON which is parsed correctly by the TRY statement, if not it throws a "key not found" error and parses the returned string in the CATCH statement (the first JSON example). Obviously this is horrible code but I cannot think of another way to do this, and I was wondering if anyone had suggestions? (please?)

Thanx in advance.

share|improve this question
9  
I strongly recommend Json.NET – AlliterativeAlice Aug 9 '13 at 19:17
    
I had similar issues with JSON.Net, there is no way to know which string you are going to get until you have it in my case. – Rick Bailly Aug 9 '13 at 19:37
    
While JSON.Net will have the same issues, it performs much better than the JSON parser you're using. – bluetoft Aug 9 '13 at 19:55
    
I appreciate the suggestion, but I still need to solve the problem... – Rick Bailly Aug 9 '13 at 20:09
    
@RickBailly does not the solution below work for you? – bluetoft Aug 10 '13 at 1:05

How about deserializing the response to an object with all of the properties on each return type and then just checking the values?

public class ReturnObject
{
     public YourModel Model {get;set;}
     public ResultObject ResponseResult {get;set;}
     public int? MessageType {get;set;}
     public string Message {get;set;}
}


string result = eml.PostData("API/Save", dataJSON.ToString());
var returnresult = new JavaScriptSerializer().Deserialize<ReturnObject>(result);
{
  if(returnresult.MessageType.HasValue)
  {
     var messageType = returnResult.MessageType.Value;
     etc etc.
  }

} 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the help. I'm not quite sure what should be referenced by public YourModel Model {get;set;} or ResultObject ResponseResult. With them I get type or namespace not found, without them I get a MessageType of 0 (the API only returns results of 1 through 17). Pardon my ignorance, please advise. – Rick Bailly Aug 12 '13 at 14:35
    
you would need to know their data structure as well and create classes for them. – bluetoft Aug 12 '13 at 14:38
    
forgot to mention I set the return integer to zero initially, so the if statement apparently doesnt return true – Rick Bailly Aug 12 '13 at 14:43
    
On further testing it appears that the if statement doesnt even hit the breakpoint I set at it if it returns the second JSON string, but the API log show a successful submission. It currently DOES work when the first json string is returned. – Rick Bailly Aug 12 '13 at 14:49
    
Another solution would be to have your messagetype be an enum type with the first enum member being None and you could check for a messagetype by saying something like if(returnresult.MessageType != MessageType.None) etc etc. A none existent enum member will get serialized to the zero value. which is the first member or your enum usually. – bluetoft Aug 12 '13 at 14:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.