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I had posted a similar question earlier. I was trying to determine whether a point lies within an ellipse. Basically I generate some bivariate normal data and create an ellipse. Heres the code I use

 library(MASS)
 set.seed(1234)
 x1<-NULL
 x2<-NULL
 k<-1
 Sigma2 <- matrix(c(.72,.57,.57,.46),2,2)
 Sigma2
 rho <- Sigma2[1,2]/sqrt(Sigma2[1,1]*Sigma2[2,2])

 eta<-replicate(300,mvrnorm(k, mu=c(-2.503,-1.632), Sigma2)) 

 p1<-exp(eta)/(1+exp(eta))
 n<-60
 x1<-replicate(300,rbinom(k,n,p1[,1]))
 x2<-replicate(300,rbinom(k,n,p1[,2]))

 rate1<-x1/60
 rate2<-x2/60

 library(car)
 dataEllipse(rate1,rate2,levels=c(0.05, 0.95)) 

I need to find out whether the pair (p1[,1],p1[,2]) lies within the area of the ellipse above.

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2 Answers 2

dataEllipse returns the ellipses as polygons, so you could use the point.in.polygon function from the sp library to check whether the points are inside the ellipse:

ell = dataEllipse(rate1, rate2, levels=c(0.05, 0.95)) 
point.in.polygon(rate1, rate2, ell$`0.95`[,1], ell$`0.95`[,2])

When I run the following code...

library(MASS)
set.seed(1234)
x1<-NULL
x2<-NULL
k<-1
Sigma2 <- matrix(c(.72,.57,.57,.46),2,2)
Sigma2
rho <- Sigma2[1,2]/sqrt(Sigma2[1,1]*Sigma2[2,2])
eta<-replicate(300,mvrnorm(k, mu=c(-2.503,-1.632), Sigma2))
p1<-exp(eta)/(1+exp(eta))
n<-60
x1<-replicate(300,rbinom(k,n,p1[,1]))
x2<-replicate(300,rbinom(k,n,p1[,2]))
rate1<-x1/60
rate2<-x2/60
library(car)
ell = dataEllipse(rate1, rate2, levels=c(0.05, 0.95))
library(sp)
point.in.polygon(rate1, rate2, ell$`0.95`[,1], ell$`0.95`[,2])

... I get the following output

  [1] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
 [56] 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
[111] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
[166] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1
[221] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
[276] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
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When I run your code I get all zeros. Not sure I am understanding it. I want to see if the pair (p1[,1],p1[,2])lies in the ellipse. In otherwords how many times does the estimated ellipse cover the true p's > library(car) > library(sp) > ell<-dataEllipse(rate1,rate2,levels=c(0.05, 0.95)) > point.in.polygon(rate1, rate2, ell$0.95[,1], ell$0.95[,2]) [1] 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 s on –  user1560215 Aug 9 '13 at 21:00
    
@user1560215: I get different output, see my edit –  Jake Aug 9 '13 at 22:10
    
Thanks for your response.I want to find out how many times in the 300 simulations does the pair (p1[,1],p1[,2]) fall within the Ellipse of (rate1,rate2). –  user1560215 Aug 11 '13 at 14:34
    
@user1560215: You can get the count of how many points fall within the ellipse using count(point.in.polygon...) (I get 289 for one run), and you can get the probability using mean(point.in.polygon(...) (in this case 0.9633). –  Jake Aug 11 '13 at 17:46
    
But for the last line of your code instead of point.in.polygon(rate1, rate2, ell$0.95[,1], ell$0.95[,2]) to find whether the true p's are contained in the estimated ellipse should I be doing point.in.polygon(p1[1,], p1[2,], ell$0.95[,1], ell$0.95[,2]) –  user1560215 Aug 11 '13 at 21:43

Just find C and subtract radius

enter image description here enter image description here

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If you figure out where the foci are located then points whose sum of the inter-focal distance plus the distances to the point from the foci will be a constant on the ellipse and could be used as a test. The example you have hacked together is correct for the degenerate case of a circle where the interfocal distance is zero. –  BondedDust Aug 9 '13 at 20:05
1  
@DWin lmfao you get a +1 sir –  Anthony Russell Aug 9 '13 at 20:06
    
@DWin also its not just for circle. Consider the radius a variable ammount –  Anthony Russell Aug 9 '13 at 20:07

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