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What is the difference between the following two functions?

__device__ inline void comparator_volatile(volatile float &A, volatile float &B, uint dir) {
float t;
if ((A > B) == dir) {
    t = A;
    A = B;
    B = t;
  }
}

__device__ inline void comparator(float &A, float &B, uint dir) {
float t;
if ((A > B) == dir) {
    t = A;
    A = B;
    B = t;
  }
  __threadfence();
}

Could anyone help me?

I implement BitonicSort in some different versions based on CUDA SDK version. For ATOMIC version (bitonicSortAtomic), I tried to use __threadfence() in __syncblocks_atomic to maintain memory consistency. But it doesn't work (the output is incorrect). I have to call comparator_volatile instead of comparator, then I get correct result. Any idea? The BitonicSort benchmark:

// (C) Copyright 2013, University of Illinois. All Rights Reserved
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "parboil.h"

#define THREADS 256
#define BLOCKS 32
#define NUM_VALS 2*THREADS*BLOCKS

__device__ volatile int mutex = 0;
__device__ inline void __syncblocks_atomic(int goal) {
    __syncthreads();
//  __threadfence();
    int tx = threadIdx.x;
    if (tx == 0) {
        atomicAdd((int *)&mutex, 1);
        while(g_mutex != goal) {}
    }
    __syncthreads();
}

__device__ inline void comparator(float &A, float &B, uint dir) {
    float t;
    if ((A > B) == dir) {
        t = A;
        A = B;
        B = t;
    }
}

__device__ inline void comparator_volatile(volatile float &A, volatile float &B, uint dir) {
    float t;
    if ((A > B) == dir) {
        t = A;
        A = B;
        B = t;
    }
}

#ifdef NAIVE
__global__ void bitonicSortNaive(float *src, int stride, int size) {
  unsigned int tid = threadIdx.x + blockDim.x * blockIdx.x;
  uint dir = (tid & (size / 2)) == 0;
  unsigned int pos = 2*tid - (tid & (stride - 1));
  comparator(src[pos], src[pos+stride], dir);
}
#endif

#ifdef ATOMIC
__global__ void bitonicSortAtomic(float *src, int length) {
  uint numBlocks = gridDim.x * gridDim.y * gridDim.z;
  uint goalVal = 0;
  uint tid = threadIdx.x + blockDim.x * blockIdx.x;
  for(uint size=2; size<=length; size<<=1) {
    for(uint stride=size>>1; stride>0; stride=stride>>1) {
      uint dir = (tid & (size / 2)) == 0;
      uint pos = 2*tid - (tid & (stride - 1));
      comparator_volatile(src[pos], src[pos+stride], dir);
      if(stride>THREADS || (stride==1 && size>=THREADS)) {
        goalVal += numBlocks;
        __syncblocks_atomic(goalVal);
      }
      else
        __syncthreads();
    } // end for stride
  } // end for size
}
#endif

int main() {
  printf("[BENCH] Bitonic Sort %d elements\n", NUM_VALS);
  printf("[BENCH] Xuhao Chen <cxh@illinois.edu>\n");
#ifdef NAIVE
  printf("[BENCH] Naive version\n");
#endif
#ifdef ATOMIC
  printf("[BENCH] Atomic Barrier\n");
#endif
  float *values = (float*) malloc( NUM_VALS * sizeof(float));
  array_init(values, NUM_VALS);
  float *dev_values;
  size_t size = NUM_VALS * sizeof(float);
  cudaMalloc((void**) &dev_values, size);
  cudaMemcpy(dev_values, values, size, cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
  dim3 blocks(BLOCKS,1);
  dim3 threads(THREADS,1);
  cudaDeviceSynchronize();

#ifdef NAIVE
  int j, k;
  for (k = 2; k <= NUM_VALS; k <<= 1) {
    for (j=k>>1; j>0; j=j>>1) {
      bitonicSortNaive<<<blocks, threads>>>(dev_values, j, k);
    }
  }
#endif

#ifdef ATOMIC
  bitonicSortAtomic<<<blocks, threads>>>(dev_values, NUM_VALS);
#endif

  cudaDeviceSynchronize();
  cudaMemcpy(values, dev_values, size, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaFree(dev_values);
  free(values);
}

__syncblocks_atomic is a function to implement global barrier. Since there is inter-block communication, I have to keep data consistency.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The CUDA programming guide states:

If a variable located in global or shared memory is declared as volatile, the compiler assumes that its value can be changed or used at any time by another thread and therefore any reference to this variable compiles to an actual memory read or write instruction.

This basically means that the memory will be flushed immediately as you assign a value to the variable, and will be fetched directly from the memory (with no cache) when you try to read its value.

In you first code sample, since both A and B are volatile, 6 actual memory instructions are generated. One read/write each time you use either A or B. The good point is that other threads will be able to see that modifications earlier, while they are made. The downside is that the execution will be slower, because the caches will be disabled.

In your second code sample, on the other side, the GPU is authorized to use caches to accelerate its execution, until the end of the function, when it's forced to issue a memory write. If both A and B are already cached, only 2 memory writes are issued. The downside is that other threads might only be able to see the changed value after the fence.

Another thing you should consider is that operations are not atomic. If other threads try to access A and B while your function is executing, they might see a partial execution of the function, in both cases. In the second code sample, this is a bit less likely to happen, because the thread will probably use its cached value, and flush the final values at once (anyway, you should not rely on this).

Also, volatile works as a faster version of __threadfence() among threads in the same warp (because threads in a warp act synchronously).

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Giulio, I implement BitonicSort in some different versions based on CUDA SDK version. For ATOMIC version (bitonicSortAtomic), I tried to use __threadfence() in __syncblocks_atomic to maintain memory consistency (see the code above). But it doesn't work (the output is incorrect). I have to call comparator_volatile instead of comparator, then I get correct result. Any idea? –  Xuhao Chen Aug 10 '13 at 18:37
    
@XuhaoChen I didn't know what a bitonic sorter is until 2 minutes ago. Anyhow, by looking at the algorithm on wikipedia, I'd say you need to use __syncthreads(), which acts as a barrier for threads in the same block. Each thread should be assigned to a fixed location, and should know what to do at each iteration. So, you should not use volatile variables, but just __syncthreads(), because you don't just want the thread to stop until the modifications it made are visible. You also need the other threads to wait until all of them have completed their iteration. –  Giulio Franco Aug 10 '13 at 21:33
    
Yes, you are right. That's exactly why I call __syncblocks_atomic() or __syncthreads() at the end of each iteration in bitonicSortAtomic() to synchronize threads in different blocks or in the same block. The problem is, for inter-block synchronization, even if you synchronize these threads, memory accesses are not consistent for threads in different blocks. So I use volatile to avoid inconsistency. But it is expensive. So I tried to use __threadfence() instead of volatile. Then I got incorrect output. –  Xuhao Chen Aug 12 '13 at 15:47

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