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I have a csv file which contains many rows of data. my function passes lineNum as an argument. So when a user enters 4 as lineNum I want to read the 4th line in the csv file. I thought a good way to go through with this would be to look for \n 's and count them,stop when the count is lineNum-1, and then proceed to read the next line. I think this is decent way of doing this, but I am thoroughly confused with the implementation. would love some help Here is my code

void ReadCsv( int lineNum){
    ifstream inFile ("/media/LOGGING/darsv1.csv");
    string line;
    string dataArray[226900];
    int i = 0;
    int endofline =0;
    int a, b, c, d, e;
    while (getline (inFile, line)) {
        //printf(line.c_str());
        istringstream linestream(line);
        string item ="";
        int itemnum = 0;
        if (lineNum==1) {
            printf(" line number is 1. ");
            while (getline (linestream, item, ',')) {
            itemnum++;
            dataArray[i]=item;
            i++;
            }
        }
        else {
            while (getline (linestream, item,'\n')) {
                endofline=endofline+1;
                cout<<"  went through line number  "<<endofline<<" ";
                printf(" inside inner while, looking for line. ");
                if (endofline == lineNum-1) {
                    printf(" found the correct line. ");
                    while (getline (linestream, item, ',')) {
                        itemnum++;
                        dataArray[i]=item;
                        i++;
                        printf(" found the correct data in the line. ");
                    }
                }
            }printf(" out of inner while. ");
        }printf(" out of outer if. ");
   }
   printf(" out of all while loops. ");
}
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marked as duplicate by dreamlax, this.lau_, Roman C, hexafraction, keyser Aug 10 '13 at 13:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you just need to read a certain line in a CSV and then from that line read the comma separated items then this might help. I agree with @sanjaya-r that you should keep it simple.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    string line, csvItem;
    ifstream myfile ("/tmp/file.csv");
    int lineNumber = 0;
    int lineNumberSought = 3;  // you may get it as argument
    if (myfile.is_open()) {
        while (getline(myfile,line)) {
            lineNumber++;
            if(lineNumber == lineNumberSought) {
                cout << line << endl; ;
                istringstream myline(line);
                while(getline(myline, csvItem, ',')) {
                    cout << csvItem << endl;
                }
            }
        }
        myfile.close();
    }
    return 0;
}
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1  
You don't have to check myfile.eof() if you use getline correctly - especially, it is a bad practice in some cases. You can read more on not using ios::eof but istream::getline correctly on some other SO Q&A! –  DanielTuzes Aug 9 '13 at 23:20
    
Thanks DanielTuzes, I updated the snippet. –  rnk Aug 10 '13 at 0:02
    
Thanks mk this totally works for me and is easy to understand :) –  Anish Chakrabarti Aug 12 '13 at 14:01

This is not compilable as it stands.

Is this your bug?

if (endofline = lineNum-1)

You are assigning lineNum - 1 to endofline. Use == for comparisons.

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that was an error on my part, thanks for pointing it out, but I still dont think it reads the correct line number, I think there is a logical error which I am not able to fix. –  Anish Chakrabarti Aug 9 '13 at 21:01
    
Show some of your input and output log, including the part where you think it's in error. –  Jongware Aug 9 '13 at 21:08
    
when I run this function with an csv file, with lineNum =5,the output reads as "went through line number 1 inside inner while, looking for line. out of inner while. out of outer if. went through line number 2 ....continues on... went through line number 6 inside inner while, looking for line. out of inner while. out of outer if. went through line number 7" So its not stopping at line 5. –  Anish Chakrabarti Aug 9 '13 at 21:22

Just keep it simple. Let one getline loop do all the work. No need to special case for first line.

// ...
linesToGo = linesNum - 1;
string line;  
while(getline(infile,line) && (linesToGo > 0)) {
    linesToGo--;
}
if (linesToGo == 0) {
    cout << "found line:," << line << endl;
    // process here.
} else {
    count << "not enough lines in file." << endl;
}

Also, dont mix cout and printf.

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There's a SO question and answer on a way to go a specific line in a text file where you can find Xeo's answer as my favourite one. Xeo uses istream::ignore, the adequate function so it is clean and fast solution.

Here's a complete example based on the answer mentioned above (with some decoration):

#include <fstream>
#include <limits>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;



fstream& Go2Line(fstream& file, unsigned int num)
{
    file.seekg(ios::beg);
    for(unsigned int i=0; i < num - 1; ++i)
        file.ignore(numeric_limits<streamsize>::max(),'\n');

    return file;
}



int main()
{
    fstream file("/media/LOGGING/darsv1.csv",ios_base::in);
    if (!file)
        cout << "Unable to open file /media/LOGGING/darsv1.csv\n";
    else 
    {
        int Number2Go = 4;
        Go2Line(file, Number2Go);

        if (!file)
            cout << "Unable to reach line " << Number2Go << ".\n";
        else
        {
            string line;
            getline(file,line);
            cout << "Line " << Number2Go << "reached successfully. It is:\n" << line;
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
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I created the following program because I am practicing with C++ algorithms. While the solution seems effective, please take it with a grain of salt (i.e., some people may consider it too complicated). On the other hand, it may help you understand certain aspects of iterators, streams, and algorithms.

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
#include<algorithm>
#include<iterator>

/**
   @brief A trick proposed by Jerry Coffin / Manuel (SO users) to
         create a line-by-line iterator. This makes an `std::istream`
         yield lines as opposed to chars.
 */
struct Line
    : std::string { 
  friend std::istream & operator>>(std::istream& is, Line& line) {   
    return std::getline(is, line);
  }
};

/**
   @brief This predicate contains an internal count of the lines read
   so far. Its `operator()(std::string)` will evaluate to `true` when
   the current line read equals the target line (provided during
   construction).

 */
struct LineNumberMatcher {
  unsigned int target_line;
  unsigned int current_line;

  LineNumberMatcher(unsigned int target_line)
      : target_line(target_line),
        current_line(0) { }

  bool operator()(const std::string& line) {
    return ++current_line == target_line;
  }
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
  if(argc != 3) {
    std::cout<<"usage: "<<argv[0]<<" filename line"<<std::endl;
    return 0;
  }

  std::string filename(argv[1]);
  unsigned int target = std::stoi(argv[2]);

  // Build the LineNumberMatcher
  LineNumberMatcher match(target);

  // Provide a scope after which the file will be automatically closed
  {
    // Open the file
    std::ifstream fp(filename);

    // Copy the line to standard output if the LineNumberMatcher
    // evaluates to true (that is, when the line read equals the target
    // line)
    std::copy_if(std::istream_iterator<Line>(fp),
                 std::istream_iterator<Line>(),
                 std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"),
                 match);
  }

  return 0;  
}

Compile with C++11 support (in my case, g++ spitline.cpp -std=c++111, using GCC 4.7.2). Sample output:

$ /a.out spitline.cpp 7 
  @brief A trick proposed by Jerry Coffin / Manuel (SO users) to

which, indeed, is line number 7 in my source code.

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