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I need help on creating an object (a sequence of numbers) in respect to some parameters of a class. Lets say I typed in to the Python IDLE shell:

SuperLotto = make_lottery_set_type('SuperLotto', 6, (1,50))
   #means user can create a 'SuperLotto' with 6 numbers in range of 1 to 50

It would make 'SuperLotto' as a new class instance of a class called 'LotteryGameType'.

This is using the code so far:

class LotterySetError(Exception):
     pass               

def make_lottery_set_type(name:str, size:int, minmax:tuple):
    if minmax[0] > minmax[1]:
        raise LotterySetError('Illegal range for tuple')
    else:
        name = LotteryGameType(name, size, minmax[0], minmax[1])
    return name

class LotteryGameType:
    def __init__(self, name, set_size, min_set_number, max_set_number):
        self.name = name
        self.set_size = set_size
        self.min_set_number = min_set_number
        self.max_set_number = max_set_number

I want to be able to create a sequence of numbers and storing it for later use so I can use it with things like overload operators (e.g. eq and ne).

I want to be able to type into the Python IDLE shell:

SuperLotto([3, 4, 19, 23, 46, 27])

This would create an object under the parameters of SuperLotto, if not under parameters of 'SuperLotto' (say more than 6 numbers), it would raise an error. Any approach would be fine. Does anyone have any ideas on how to approach this?

share|improve this question
    
Please use the python tag to indicate that your question is about Python. –  John Saunders Aug 9 '13 at 23:55
    
Thanks for reminding me. –  user2559679 Aug 9 '13 at 23:57
    
SuperLotto isn't a class, it's a global variable, an instance of type LotteryGameType, that you created by calling make_lottery_set_type. So, it's not going to be callable like a function, unless you add a __call__ method to LotteryGameType. Which is probably not what you want. Take a step back and explain why you're trying to call it. Maybe you actually wanted it to be a class or a function, not an instance? –  abarnert Aug 10 '13 at 0:03
    
Let's see.. I think you're getting at the idea I'm trying to figure out. The approach would be that SuperLotto is a class so I can type in the shell: super1 = SuperLotto([1,2,3,4,5,6]) super2 = SuperLotto([2,3,4,5,6,7]) I can compare those two: super1 == super2 and it would return False. –  user2559679 Aug 10 '13 at 0:11
    
So you want to write a make_lottery_set_type that returns a class, instead of a LotteryGameType instance? OK, that's doable. –  abarnert Aug 10 '13 at 0:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It sounds like what you want is for make_lottery_set_type to return a new class, presumably one that's a subclass of LotteryGameType, rather than returning an instance of that type.

This is actually pretty easy to do in Python. Class definitions are just normal code, that you can run anywhere, even in the middle of a function. And they have access to the local environment while they're running. And classes themselves are "first-class values", meaning you can pass them around and return them from functions. So:

def make_lottery_set_type(name:str, size:int, minmax:tuple):
    if minmax[0] > minmax[1]:
        raise LotterySetError('Illegal range for tuple')
    else:
        class NewLotteryGameType(LotteryGameType):
            def __init__(self, numbers):
                super().__init__(name, size, minmax[0], minmax[1])
                self.numbers = numbers
        return NewLotteryGameType

If you want to add other methods, that's the same as adding methods to any other class. For example:

def make_lottery_set_type(name:str, size:int, minmax:tuple):
    if minmax[0] > minmax[1]:
        raise LotterySetError('Illegal range for tuple')
    else:
        class NewLotteryGameType(LotteryGameType):
            def __init__(self, numbers):
                super().__init__(name, size, minmax[0], minmax[1])
                self.numbers = numbers
            def __eq__(self, rhs):
                return set(self.numbers) == set(rhs.numbers)
        return NewLotteryGameType

So:

>>> SuperLotto = make_lottery_set_type('SuperLotto', 6, (1,50))
>>> super1 = SuperLotto([1,2,3,4,5,6])
>>> super2 = SuperLotto([6,5,4,3,2,1])
>>> super3 = SuperLotto([7,8,9,10,11,12])
>>> super1 == super2
True
>>> super1 == super3
False

(Obviously you can define __eq__ however you want, if set-equality isn't the right rule for your use.)


If you try to inspect the values you're generating, they don't look quite as pretty as you might like. For example, you'd probably rather see SuperLotto rather than NewLotteryGameType in places like this:

>>> super1
<__main__.NewLotteryGameType at 0x10259e490>
>>> SuperLotto.__name__
'NewLotteryGameType'

For that, just add NewLotteryGameType.__name__ = name. You might also want to copy over the docstring from the parent class, or various other things.

More generally, look at functools.update_wrapper (which is designed for wrapping up functions, not classes, but many of the details are the same) for inspiration, and the inspect module docs from your Python version for all of the attributes that classes can have.


In a comment, you ask:

The only problem is that I want NewLotteryGameType to inherit the parameters such as name, set_size, min_set_number, max_set_number from LotteryGameType. So lets say I wanted to type in NewLotteryGameType.set_size in to the Python Shell. I want it to return back to me 6.

That's contradictory. If you want to inherit the instance attributes of LotteryGameType… well, you already do. For example:

>>> super1.set_size
6

If you want them to be accessible off the class, then they can't be instance attributes, they have to be class attributes. And just changing set_size to a class attribute of LotteryGameType and inheriting it won't work, because the whole point of a class attribute is that the same value shared by all instances of the class or any of its subclasses, and the subclasses all need different values.

But you could do something like this:

class LotteryGameType:
    def __init__(self, min_set_number, max_set_number):
        self.min_set_number = min_set_number
        self.max_set_number = max_set_number

def make_lottery_set_type(lottery_name:str, size:int, minmax:tuple):
    if minmax[0] > minmax[1]:
        raise LotterySetError('Illegal range for tuple')
    else:
        class NewLotteryGameType(LotteryGameType):
            name = lottery_name
            set_size = size
            def __init__(self, numbers):
                super().__init__(minmax[0], minmax[1])
                self.numbers = numbers
            def __eq__(self, rhs):
                return set(self.numbers) == set(rhs.numbers)
        return NewLotteryGameType

(Notice that I had to rename the first make_ parameter to lottery_name so it was different from the class attribute name, because of the way scopes work.) Now, name and set_size are not instance attributes, nor are they class attributes of LotteryGameType—but they're class attributes of each NewLotteryGameType. So:

>>> SuperLotto = make_lottery_set_type('SuperLotto', 6, (1,50))
>>> SuperDuperLotto = make_lottery_set_type('SuperDuperLotto', 8, (1,100))
>>> SuperLotto.set_size
6
>>> SuperDuperLotto.set_size
8

What if you create instances of those types? Well, Python looks for attributes in the instance, then in the most-derived class, and then the base classes. So as long as you don't create instance attributes with the same name (notice that I removed the extra params, and the code that set instance attributes, from the LotteryGameType.__init__ method), it does just what you'd want:

>>> super1 = SuperLotto([1,2,3,4,5,6])
>>> super1.set_size
6
>>> duper1 = SuperDuperLotto([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8])
>>> duper1.set_size
8

Of course this means that LotteryGameType is no longer a usable type on its own; only its subclasses are usable. But that's probably what you wanted anyway, right? You could even consider making it explicitly an abstract base class to make sure nobody accidentally tries to use a direct LotteryGameType instance.

If you're feeling brave, you might want to read up on metaclasses and see how you could adapt this whole design into use a LotteryGameMetaclass, so each new class is an instance of that metaclass instead of a subclass of the (abstract) base class. The source for the new enum module in 3.4, or the near-equivalent external flufl.enum package, might make good sample code. Then you can play with both and see how similar and how different they are.

share|improve this answer
    
Woah, thank you very much! We can add overload operators under NewLotteryGameType right? EDIT: I just added repr under it. And it works. This goes for ne and eq as well? :) –  user2559679 Aug 10 '13 at 0:40
    
@user2559679: I already added __eq__ under it. So of course you can add __ne__ as well. –  abarnert Aug 10 '13 at 1:02
    
Hmm, so I'm almost finished with my program. The only problem is that I want NewLotteryGameType to inherit the parameters such as name, set_size, min_set_number, max_set_number from LotteryGameType. So lets say I wanted to type in NewLotteryGameType.set_size in to the Python Shell. I want it to return back to me 6. Any ideas on how to do that? –  user2559679 Aug 10 '13 at 2:35
    
What you're asking for is contradictory. In LotteryGameType, the set_size is an instance attribute, not a class attribute. And it gets inherited exactly as you'd want: super1.set_size will return 6. But that means you can't access it off a class, only off an instance of the class. If you want to make it a class attribute instead, you can… but then it's not inherited from LotteryGameType, it's defined by each new subclass. So… which one do you want? –  abarnert Aug 12 '13 at 17:56

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