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I've been working with problems (such as pentagonal numbers) that involve generating a list based on the previous elements in the list. I can't seem to find a built-in function of the form I want. Essentially, I'm looking for a function of the form:

([a] -> a) -> [a] -> [a]

Where ([a] -> a) takes the list so far and yields the next element that should be in the list and a or [a] is the initial list. I tried using iterate to achieve this, but that yields a list of lists, which each successive list having one more element (so to get the 3000th element I have to do (list !! 3000) !! 3000) instead of list !! 3000.

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2  
I don't think you'll find anything built-in, but you can do this via unfoldr - \f -> unfoldr (\s -> let x = f s in Just (x, x:s)). –  Vitus Aug 10 '13 at 1:13
    
you can map a selector over your iteratively constructed list, like map last, to get the desired list of values out of a list of lists. But it's better to build the interim lists reversed, constructed by (:), so that map head can be used. You might then discover it's possible to restructure the whole computation, as in e.g. here, by using separate reference, to the list being defined, in your "nextStep" function to access the result list as it is being built (taking care of course to keep access only to the parts of it defined so far). –  Will Ness Aug 10 '13 at 16:48
    
Conduit package and you'll have Source List –  wit Aug 10 '13 at 18:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If the recurrence depends on a constant number of previous terms, then you can define the series using standard corecursion, like with the fibonacci sequence:

-- fibs(0) = 1
-- fibs(1) = 1
-- fibs(n+2) = fibs(n) + fibs(n+1)
fibs = 1 : 1 : zipWith (+) fibs (tail fibs)

-- foos(0) = -1
-- foos(1) = 0
-- foos(2) = 1
-- foos(n+3) = foos(n) - 2*foos(n+1) + foos(n+2)
foos = -1 : 0 : 1 : zipWith (+) foos 
                        (zipWith (+) 
                            (map (negate 2 *) (tail foos)) 
                            (tail $ tail foos))

Although you can introduce some custom functions to make the syntax a little nicer

(#) = flip drop
infixl 7 #
zipMinus = zipWith (-)
zipPlus  = zipWith (+)

-- foos(1) = 0
-- foos(2) = 1
-- foos(n+3) = foos(n) - 2*foos(n+1) + foos(n+2)
foos = -1 : 0 : 1 : ( ( foos # 0  `zipMinus` ((2*) <$> foos # 1) )
                                  `zipPlus`  foos # 2 )

However, if the number of terms varies, then you'll need a different approach.

For example, consider p(n), the number of ways in which a given positive integer can be expressed as a sum of positive integers.

p(n) = p(n-1) + p(n-2) - p(n-5) - p(n-7) + p(n-12) + p(n-15) - ...

We can define this more simply as

p(n) = ∑ k ∈ [1,n) q(k) p(n-k)

Where

-- q( i ) | i == (3k^2+5k)/2 = (-1) ^ k
--        | i == (3k^2+7k+2)/2 = (-1) ^ k
--        | otherwise         = 0
q = go id 1
  where go zs c = zs . zs . (c:) . zs . (c:) $ go ((0:) . zs) (negate c)

 ghci> take 15 $ zip [1..] q
 [(1,1),(2,1),(3,0),(4,0),(5,-1),(6,0),(7,-1),(8,0),(9,0),(10,0),(11,0),(12,1),
  (13,0),(14,0),(15,1)]

Then we could use iterate to define p:

 p = map head $ iterate next [1]
   where next xs = sum (zipWith (*) q xs) : xs

Note how iterate next creates a series of reversed prefixes of p to make it easy to use q to calculate the next element of p. We then take the head element of each of these reversed prefixes to find p.

ghci> next [1]
[1,1]
ghci> next it
[2,1,1]
ghci> next it
[3,2,1,1]
ghci> next it
[5,3,2,1,1]
ghci> next it
[7,5,3,2,1,1]
ghci> next it
[11,7,5,3,2,1,1]
ghci> next it
[15,11,7,5,3,2,1,1]
ghci> next it
[22,15,11,7,5,3,2,1,1]

Abstracting this out to a pattern, we can get the function you were looking for:

construct :: ([a] -> a) -> [a] -> [a]
construct f = map head . iterate (\as -> f as : as)

p = construct (sum . zipWith (*) q) [1]

Alternately, we could do this in the standard corecursive style if we define a helper function to generate the reversed prefixes of a list:

rInits :: [a] -> [[a]]
rInits = scanl (flip (:)) []

p = 1 : map (sum . zipWith (*) q) (tail $ rInits p)
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