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I know this question has probably been asked in this forum many times and in the web as well. I am asked to create an implementation of a big integer in c++, however there is a constraint that one of my constructor should take an int as an argument... so I am guessing there will be more than one non-default constructor... so my question is, what would be the easiest way to do this??

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sounds like homework –  Alon Nov 29 '09 at 15:29
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well as c++ is an oo, one of the homework requirements is to implement it my self and I should organize it this way: BigInteger basically is a vector of pointers of BigBit. BigBit must overload the standard logic operators on bits, such as &, |, ~, and ^. So I implement BigBit as a bool.... Now the questions is how can I store large numbers in the BigInteger class. How does it work if I have such constraint?? And yes this is homework, I am just trying to find ideas or insights on how to do this the easiest way.... –  Alex Nov 29 '09 at 15:49
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3 Answers

The question, then, seems to be "how do I turn an integer into a list of bits"? Put another way, what's the base-2 representation of an integer?

As this is supposed to be homework, let me talk around the problem by thinking in base-10; the appropriate changes should be obvious with some thought.

Given a base 10 number, it's pretty easy to figure out what the rightmost digit is: It's just the remainder when dividing by 10. E.g. if n=1234, then it's rightmost digit is n%10 = 4. To get the next rightmost digit, we divide by 10 (getting 123), and repeat the process. So:

1234/10=123; 1234%10 = 4
123/10=12  ; 123%10 = 3
12/10=1    ; 12%10 = 2
1/10=0     ; 1%10 = 1

So now we've gotten the answers [4,3,2,1]. If we reverse them, we have the base-10 digits of our number: [1, 2, 3, 4].

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this works if the integer is small... what if the integer is large such as 2^10... definitely I need to store this in a variable first before converting it to bits... now the problem is what kind of variable would be able to store it... a string would do it, but then how do I convert a string to a binary .... –  Alex Nov 29 '09 at 17:22
    
2^10 isn't really that large. And the algorithm I hint at takes only one division and one modulo per digit of the answer. It'll work fine if the number you start with fits in a machine word (e.g. unsigned int). And if it doesn't, what are we trying to convert again? –  Managu Nov 29 '09 at 18:14
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C++ BigInt class
C++ Big Integer Library
to write big int for example :

typedef struct {
    int high, low;
} BiggerInt;

BiggerInt add( const BiggerInt *lhs, const BiggerInt *rhs ) {
    BiggerInt ret;

    /* Ideally, you'd want a better way to check for overflow conditions */
    if ( rhs->high < INT_MAX - lhs->high ) {
        /* With a variable-length (a real) BigInt, you'd allocate some more room here */
    }

    ret.high = lhs->high + rhs->high;

    if ( rhs->low < INT_MAX - lhs->low ) {
        /* No overflow */
        ret.low = lhs->low + rhs->low;
    }
    else {
        /* Overflow */
        ret.high += 1;
        ret.low = lhs->low - ( INT_MAX - rhs->low ); /* Right? */
    }

    return ret;
}
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Why reinvent the wheel? Use the GNU MP library.

[EDIT] Smells like homework. So when you have a BigBit class, then do this:

  1. Clear all bits
  2. Write a loop which goes over all bits on the int argument of the constructor
  3. For each bit in the int argument which is != 0, set the bit in the BigBit vector.
share|improve this answer
    
well as c++ is an oo, one of the requirements is to implement it my self and I should organize it this way: BigInteger basically is a vector of pointers of BigBit. BigBit must overload the standard logic operators on bits, such as &, |, ~, and ^. So I implement BigBit as a bool.... Now the questions is how can I store large numbers in the BigInteger class. How does it work if I have such constraint –  Alex Nov 29 '09 at 15:47
    
that is also if the argument is an int, we're talking about large numbers here.. so an int wouldn't hold it... what if the argument is a string, how would you convert the string to bits.... representing that large number –  Alex Nov 29 '09 at 17:23
    
Look at the source code for atoi() how to convert a string to its binary representation. It's pretty simple. See koders.com for an example: koders.com/c/… –  Aaron Digulla Nov 30 '09 at 8:36
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