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I want to be able to click the button and have the message box display the code generated. Here's part of the code:

global s
letters = [random.choice('BCDFGHJKMPQRTVWXYYZ')  for x in range(19)]
numbers = [random.choice('2346789') for x in range(6)]
s = letters + numbers
random.shuffle(s)
s = ''.join(s)

global Code
Code = Entry(state='readonly')

def callback():
    Code = Entry(state='readonly', textvariable=s)

Code.grid(row=0, pady=20)
generate=PhotoImage(file='generate.gif')
G = Button(image=generate , command=callback, compound=CENTER)
G.grid(row=1, padx=206.5, pady=20) 
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This is Tkinter, right? It's worth mentioning/tagging the GUI framework you're using. –  Brionius Aug 10 '13 at 4:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Fixed a few things up with comments:

from Tkinter import *
import random
root = Tk()

letters = [random.choice('BCDFGHJKMPQRTVWXYYZ')  for x in range(19)]
numbers = [random.choice('2346789') for x in range(6)]
s = letters + numbers
random.shuffle(s)
s = ''.join(s)

# Rather than use global variables, which is generally a bad idea, we can make a callback creator function, which takes the formerly global variables as arguments, and simply uses them to create the callback function.
def makeCallback(sVariable):
    def callback():
# This will set the text of the entry
        sVar.set(s)
    return callback

# Use a StringVar to alter the text in the Entry
sVar = StringVar(root)
# You can use an Entry for this, but it seems like a Label is more what you're looking for.
Code = Entry(root, state='readonly', textvariable=sVar)

# Create a callback function
callback = makeCallback(sVar)

Code.grid(row=0, pady=20)
generate=PhotoImage(file='generate.gif')
G = Button(root, image=None , command=callback, compound=CENTER)
G.grid(row=1, padx=206.5, pady=20) 
share|improve this answer
    
Defining a function within a function is never good form. Look into lambda functions instead. –  The-IT Aug 10 '13 at 14:23
    
@The-IT I disagree. Lambda functions are convenient if you are trying to generate a short function, but defining a function in a function is perfectly acceptable, and even preferable if the generated function is longer than a line or two. –  Brionius Aug 10 '13 at 14:30
    
Your function in a function does not even make sense to me. It takes the parameter sVariable and then never uses it. You're much better off deleting that entire part of the code and the callback = makeCallback(sVar) and then in button do command=lambda s=s: sVar.set(s). –  The-IT Aug 11 '13 at 3:37
    
Actually, you're right about a couple things - I made a mistake - I meant to write sVariable.set(s), and actually the callback factory isn't necessary here because sVar is defined on the module level - I'm used to writing GUIs inside a class, where you would need a callback factory (or a lambda statement). But there are plenty of circumstances where callback factories are useful; for instance, what would you do if the callback needs to execute several commands? The lambda function starts getting pretty unreadable. –  Brionius Aug 11 '13 at 3:59
    
What I would do is that I would have a normal function that calls a bunch of other functions if needed. This can very easily be done from a class. Also, I was always taught that defining a function in a function is always bad form, and I agree because I don't see a situation where that would be necessary. –  The-IT Aug 11 '13 at 4:29

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