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I need to implement a map of counters (like Map) in my application. However this structure is supposed to be accessed by several threads.

It looks like ConcurrentHashMap<Key, Long> is not a proper solution, right?

I thought about ConcurrentHashMap<Key, AtomicLong> instead.

But there is a problem - requests for increment are not spread evenly. Few most popular Keys could have up to 95% of all increment requests to this data structure.

As far as I understand this will lead to concurrent access to single AtomicLong instances and there many locks should occur which will somewhat decrease efficiency.

Question 1: Is there any better solution - perhaps, better data type instead of AtomicLong, which allows short accumulation of increments or something like this?

Question 2: I want to persist the structure to disk periodically (perhaps, every minute), and I want to persist its "actual" state (with all recent updates settled?) - what is most straightforward way for it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What makes you think AtomicLong uses locks internaly? That is not true, it's mostly built on CAS operations. My advice would be to implement it with AtomicLong and profile the implementation later. If (and only if) your counter will be a bottleneck, then consider replacing it with any other implementation.

"We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil" - Donald Knuth

As of state persistence the simplient aproach is to serialize your map:

ByteArrayOutputStream out = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
ObjectOutputStream objOut = new ObjectOutputStream(out);
objOut.writeObject(map);
objOut.close();
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Thanks for pointing the fact that AtomicLong works differently than I thought! About persisting the main question was not technical writing the map, but rather "whether I need to undertake some measures to ensure all last updates will be persisted with simple serializing of this data structure?" I am sorry for not making me clear enough. –  Rodion Gorkovenko Aug 10 '13 at 5:54
    
As far as I know no specific measures are necessary. When doing serialization CHM locks segments one by one, so all the latest updates should be included. Serialization, however, is not itself atomic. If some updates will be done in the midle of the serialization process, they may or may not be included in resulting snaphot depending on how lucky you are. If this matters for you, consider the Stephen's advice in the post below to swap the map. –  Jk1 Aug 10 '13 at 6:08

Firstly, you are at risk of "premature optimization" here. There is a good chance that the concurrency hotspot/bottleneck that you are worried about won't be significant.

Having said that:

A ConcurrentHashMap<Key, AtomicLong> sounds a good option unless the concurrency hotspots are a major issue. The ConcurrentHashMap should largely avoid problems with the concurrency of the map, and an AtomicLong will give good performance unless there is extreme contention on a single counter.

Is there any better solution - perhaps, better data type instead of AtomicLong, which allows short accumulation of increments or something like this?

That might work. (For instance, each thread could have its own (non-concurrent) map, and use Long or a non-synchronized custom long holder class, rather than AtomicLong.)

However, the downsides of doing this are:

  • The memory usage could be significantly greater.
  • You would have have the additional overhead of combining multiple maps into one to get the final counts. That step is most likely going to involve a serial computation.

All in all, I'd be surprised if this improved performance unless you have a huge number of cores and a very high rate of counting.

I want to persist the structure to disk periodically (perhaps, every minute), and I want to persist its "actual" state (with all recent updates settled?) - what is most straightforward way for it?

The most straightforward way to do it is to stop everything while you persist.

If that is not acceptable, then you need to do something like this:

  1. Decide to persist.
  2. Create a new ConcurrentHashMap<Key, AtomicLong> instance.
  3. Atomically replace the existing map with the new one ... so that you can accumulate counts.
  4. Persist the old map.
  5. Iterate the old map, atomically transferring the counts for each key to the new map.
  6. Discard the old map.
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