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I've got a requirement

.domain
.domain.com
.domain.com/path
.domain.com:443/path
domain.com
domain.com/path
domain.com:443/path
domain
/path
:443/path

Should all be true

However

.
./path
.:443
*.domain
*.domain/path
*.domain:443/path
/
:443
*/path
anything with ? in it

should all return false.

I came up with the below in JS. But, after a few modifications I am completely lost..

/^\.?[^:\/]([\da-z\.-]+)\.?([a-z\.]{2,6})?(:[0-9]+)?([\/\w \.-]*)*\/?$/ 

My test stub looks below:

console.log(urlRegExp('*.domain/path'));
console.log(urlRegExp('*.domain:443/path'));
console.log(urlRegExp('/'));
console.log(urlRegExp(':443'));
console.log(urlRegExp('*/path'));
console.log(urlRegExp('domain.com?q=a'));

function urlRegExp(){ 
  return /^\.?[^:\/]([\da-z\.-]+)\.?([a-z\.]{2,6})?(:[0-9]+)?([\/\w \.-]*)*\/?$/.test(arguments[0]) + " " + arguments[0];  
} 

I am unable to handle all the listed strings with this pattern. Whenever I change something to make something pass, another string fails. I am a beginner and just started into understanding RegEx deeply with the cookbook. However, it might take a while and I need it to be done sooner. Any help or guidance would be awesome.

Current Results:

should return true:

true .domain
true .domain.com
true .domain.com/path
true .domain.com:443/path
true domain.com
true domain.com/path
true domain.com:443/path
true domain
false /path  -- should be true
false :443/path  -- should be true

should return false:

false . 
false ./path
false .:443
true *.domain -- should be false
true *.domain/path -- should be false
true *.domain:443/path -- should be false
false /
false :443
false */path
false domain.com?q=a
share|improve this question
1  
This is impossible. As an example: The 3rd of the true rules .domain.com/path is forbidden by the nineth of the false rules */path (given a reasonable interpretation of *). What you you think * should mean for your scheme to make sense? –  David-SkyMesh Aug 10 '13 at 9:36
    
Why does this specific set of rules exist? What exactly are you trying to validate? Input how? To where? Under what circumstances? –  David-SkyMesh Aug 10 '13 at 9:40
    
The tests seem to indicated that * is a litteral *. Is it? Or does it mean it anything? –  Qtax Aug 10 '13 at 9:42
    
The exercise seems to be pattern recognition in your test set, rather than finding a regular expression for it. Try to figure out the rules first. –  jgroenen Aug 10 '13 at 9:46
    
It's a URL redirection form. The user should not input a URL pattern that violates above rules. URL pattern, not just the URL. So, a * means a literal *. –  San Aug 10 '13 at 10:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Maybe something like this...

/^[./:a-z]([0-9]+\/)?[a-z]+[^?]*$/

Explained here...

/^                 # Start regex, and start matching
[./:a-z]           # starts with dot, slash, colon or a-z
([0-9]+\/)?        # optionally has multi-digit number followed by slash
[a-z]+             # has one or more letters next
[^?]*              # has zero or more characters that are not `?`
$/                 # end of matching and end regex

Hard to know the specifics of what you are aiming for

Tests in...

Coffeescript

rex = /^[./:a-z]([0-9]+\/)?[a-z]+[^?]*$/

for str in """
.domain
.domain.com
.domain.com/path
.domain.com:443/path
domain.com
domain.com/path
domain.com:443/path
domain
/path
:443/path
""".split /[\r\n]+/
    console.log "Should be true - is #{if str.match rex then 'true ' else 'false'} #{str}"

for str in """
.
./path
.:443
*.domain
*.domain/path
*.domain:443/path
/
:443
*/path
domain.com?
domain.?com
?domain.com
""".split /[\r\n]+/
    console.log "Should be false - is #{if str.match rex then 'true ' else 'false'} #{str}"

and in...

Javascript

var rex, str, _i, _j, _len, _len1, _ref, _ref1;

rex = /^[./:a-z]([0-9]+\/)?[a-z]+[^?]*$/;

_ref = ".domain\n.domain.com\n.domain.com/path\n.domain.com:443/path\ndomain.com\ndomain.com/path\ndomain.com:443/path\ndomain\n/path\n:443/path".split(/[\r\n]+/);
for (_i = 0, _len = _ref.length; _i < _len; _i++) {
  str = _ref[_i];
  console.log("Should be true - is " + (str.match(rex) ? 'true ' : 'false') + " " + str);
}

_ref1 = ".\n./path\n.:443\n*.domain\n*.domain/path\n*.domain:443/path\n/\n:443\n*/path\ndomain.com?\ndomain.?com\n?domain.com".split(/[\r\n]+/);
for (_j = 0, _len1 = _ref1.length; _j < _len1; _j++) {
  str = _ref1[_j];
  console.log("Should be false - is " + (str.match(rex) ? 'true ' : 'false') + " " + str);
}

Both output the same...

Should be true - is true  .domain
Should be true - is true  .domain.com
Should be true - is true  .domain.com/path
Should be true - is true  .domain.com:443/path
Should be true - is true  domain.com
Should be true - is true  domain.com/path
Should be true - is true  domain.com:443/path
Should be true - is true  domain
Should be true - is true  /path
Should be true - is true  :443/path
Should be false - is false .
Should be false - is false ./path
Should be false - is false .:443
Should be false - is false *.domain
Should be false - is false *.domain/path
Should be false - is false *.domain:443/path
Should be false - is false /
Should be false - is false :443
Should be false - is false */path
Should be false - is false  domain.com?
Should be false - is false  domain.?com
Should be false - is false ?domain.com
share|improve this answer
    
That works great. Now I'm going through it repeatedly to know the magic.. :D –  San Aug 10 '13 at 10:02
    
How do I handle the last two? domain.com? and domain.?com –  San Aug 10 '13 at 10:08
1  
Sorry, the last two are handled correctly now. I updated the answer just after I posted, but forgot to update the console.log output. The ? is handled by [^?] which is a negated character set, meaning anything except ?. So the whole string matches only a certain bunch of characters at the start, and anything except ? up until the end of the string. –  Billy Moon Aug 10 '13 at 10:27
1  
I should also mention, that the javascript is compiled directly from the coffee-script, and could be written much more simply if written by hand. –  Billy Moon Aug 10 '13 at 10:30
1  
I used \r\n to cover any case - force of habit to try to make my regexes portable - although I think \n only would suffice for javascript on any operating system. Also, it is not \r followed by \n but a character set of \r and \n, where I am saying any number of consecutive \r or `n`s of either type are my delimiter, so even \r\r\n\r\n\n\n would act as delimiter. –  Billy Moon Aug 10 '13 at 14:46

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