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I have a problem when attempting to use std::map in clang-3.3 and clang-3.0 on Ubuntu 12.04:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <string>

class A
{
public:
#if 0 //clang compiles ok
    typedef std::map<std::string,std::string> MapKeyValue_t;
    void PrintMap(const MapKeyValue_t &my_map 
        = MapKeyValue_t())
#else // clang compiles fail
    void PrintMap(const std::map<std::string,std::string> &my_map 
    = std::map<std::string,std::string>())
#endif
{
    std::map<std::string,std::string>::const_iterator it;
    for (it = my_map.begin(); it != my_map.end(); it++)
    {
        std::cout << it->first << " " << it->second << std::endl;
    }
}
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    a.PrintMap();
    return 0;
}

However, while the code compiles in both g++ and clang I keep getting these errors as output:

test.cpp:14:36: error: expected ')'
        = std::map<std::string,std::string>())
                                          ^
test.cpp:13:15: note: to match this '('
        void PrintMap(const std::map<std::string,std::string> &my_map 
                     ^
test.cpp:14:24: error: expected '>'
        = std::map<std::string,std::string>())
                              ^
test.cpp:28:13: error: too few arguments to function call, expected 2, have 0
        a.PrintMap();
        ~~~~~~~~~~ ^
test.cpp:13:2: note: 'PrintMap' declared here
        void PrintMap(const std::map<std::string,std::string> &my_map 
        ^
3 errors generated.

The closest thing I could find that matches my problem is this topic: How to pass std::map as a default constructor parameter

But, I have no idea what's wrong. Hopefully, someone can shed some light on this, please.

Update:

void PrintMap(const std::map<std::string,std::string> &my_map 
        = (std::map<std::string,std::string>()))

is ok. Thanks.

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Looks like llvm.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=13657 - suggested workaround is to put parens around the default argument, which does make it compile here. –  Mat Aug 10 '13 at 10:01

2 Answers 2

I compiled and run it successfully in vs2012.
So I think it's compilers problem.

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Thanks. I guess it's clang bug, and I'm also waiting clang forks' help. –  xiaoyur347 Aug 10 '13 at 10:04
    
why do you use gcc? i never saw clang before! –  BlackMamba Aug 10 '13 at 10:07
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Jan Doggen Aug 10 '13 at 10:20
2  
@JanDoggen While I agree that this answer is very low quality it actually is an answer ("it's a compiler bug"). –  orlp Aug 10 '13 at 10:34
    
@BlackMamba why not using gcc? why do you use vs2012? Is it free? Is it good? clang is one of, if not the, best c++11 compilers. This seems a rare glitch. –  Walter Aug 10 '13 at 11:10

The other posters are correct, I think this is an instance of Bug 13657 which should be fixed in Clang 3.4.

As mentioned in the bug report and the C++ Standard Core Language Active Issues page linked from there (and as you mentioned in your update), you can work around the issue by adding parentheses to the default value as follows:

void PrintMap(const std::map<std::string,std::string> &my_map 
    = (std::map<std::string,std::string>()))
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