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I'm trying to copy files from one directory to another and append current date to this filename. The script look like this

#!/bin/bash

echo 'Move to homedir'
cd $HOME

echo 'Copy .txt files'
NOW=$(date +"%d%m%Y")

for FILENAME in *.txt
do
        cp "${FILENAME}" "/newdir/${FILENAME}${NOW}"
done

This generates an error because date is appended after file extension, like this

file1.txt10082013

How to avoid that?

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

How about extracting the extension and renaming the file:

NAME="${FILENAME%.*}"
EXT="${FILENAME##*.}

cp "${FILENAME}" "/newdir/${NAME}${NOW}.${EXT}"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, what are these %% and ## after filename? – Matkrupp Aug 10 '13 at 10:10
    
@Matkrupp They delete portions of the string. See more at tldp. – cnicutar Aug 10 '13 at 10:10
    
Ok, thanks, I tried it but it generates an error saying: cp: cannot create regular file `/newdir/file109082013.txt': No such file or directory – Matkrupp Aug 10 '13 at 10:19
    
@Matkrupp It probably means /newdir doesn't exist – cnicutar Aug 10 '13 at 10:22
    
Yes, I found the reason for this, changed "/newdir/" to "$HOME/newdir" and now it was pointing to the right directory. Thanks for this! – Matkrupp Aug 10 '13 at 10:25

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