Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have to solve a problem in C++, in which I have to calculate a modulus of a number formed as 10^n. But the problem is that n is a floating point number so if I calculate 10^n as pow(10.0, n) then it might overflow. So I'm seeking for a solution which can calculate 10^n mod m without any overflow problem. I'm normally use Python, where it's very straightforward, I don't know how to solve in C++.

share|improve this question
    
Modulus is not defined for floating-point numbers : if the exponent is floating-point, then the expression X^e could result in floating-point. –  Nawaz Aug 10 '13 at 11:21
    
log(n) != 10^n... Do you mean exp(n)? –  Oli Charlesworth Aug 10 '13 at 11:21
    
my mistake, I have edited the question. If I am given with n = log(num) then I want to find 10^n % m, where n may be a floating point number. –  nik_kgp Aug 10 '13 at 11:29
    
possible duplicate of Can't use modulus on doubles? –  dasblinkenlight Aug 10 '13 at 11:30
2  
10^7.5 is about 31622776.601683793319988935444327 what answer do you want when taking this mod 6 ? –  brian beuning Aug 10 '13 at 11:42

1 Answer 1

How about rounding first, storing the digits smaller than 1 in a float variable (you will get them by substracting the rounded variable from the original float) and then do the modulo with the rounded value. Afterwards add up the float variable

Will this solve your problem?

EDIT (see comment and for better look ;-) )

 10^7.4 = 25118864.315[...]
 --> round = 25118864,
     float = 0.315,
     round % 6 = 2,

 --> (10^7.4)%6 = 2 + 0.315 = 2.315

as calc at windows would give you

share|improve this answer
    
Consider this e.g. 10^7.4 mod 6. So the float value is 0.6 and rounded value is 7. 10^7 mod 6 gives 4 and if we add float value it is 4.6. And the right answer is 2.315. –  nik_kgp Aug 10 '13 at 13:02
    
no i meant round(10^7.4) –  Martin Aug 10 '13 at 13:05
    
for better understanding ... 10^7.4 = 25118864.315[...] --> round = 25118864, float = 0.315, round % 6 = 2, (10^7.4)%6 = 2 + 0.315 = 2.315 which is what calc at windows would give you –  Martin Aug 10 '13 at 13:11
    
But as I mentioned in my question, n may be large so if I do it in C++, it might overflow. How will I handle that situation? –  nik_kgp Aug 10 '13 at 13:13
    
normally to prevent overflow you use log() in numerics. You could maybe implement an if greater than 10^5 or so, and then use log() before round, ... but the difficulty is then to implement modulo correctly transformed to log –  Martin Aug 10 '13 at 13:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.