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I have a python dictionary of user-item ratings that looks something like this:

sample={'user1': {'item1': 2.5, 'item2': 3.5, 'item3': 3.0, 'item4': 3.5, 'item5': 2.5, 'item6': 3.0}, 
'user2': {'item1': 2.5, 'item2': 3.0, 'item3': 3.5, 'item4': 4.0}, 
'user3': {'item2':4.5,'item5':1.0,'item6':4.0}}

I was looking to convert it into a pandas data frame that would be structured like

     col1   col2  col3
0   user1  item1   2.5
1   user1  item2   3.5
2   user1  item3   3.0
3   user1  item4   3.5
4   user1  item5   2.5
5   user1  item6   3.0
6   user2  item1   2.5
7   user2  item2   3.0
8   user2  item3   3.5
9   user2  item4   4.0
10  user3  item2   4.5
11  user3  item5   1.0
12  user3  item6   4.0

Any ideas would be much appreciated :)

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try following code:

import pandas

sample={'user1': {'item1': 2.5, 'item2': 3.5, 'item3': 3.0, 'item4': 3.5, 'item5': 2.5, 'item6': 3.0},
        'user2': {'item1': 2.5, 'item2': 3.0, 'item3': 3.5, 'item4': 4.0},
        'user3': {'item2':4.5,'item5':1.0,'item6':4.0}}

df = pandas.DataFrame([
    [col1,col2,col3] for col1, d in sample.items() for col2, col3 in d.items()
])
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome. Thanks :) –  Godel Aug 10 '13 at 12:48
1  
Great, But how to oppose the task. i.e. if dataframe is given how to convert it into dictionary. Also if the column are randomly suffled. –  BlackRabbitt Oct 31 '13 at 13:21
1  
@BlackRabbitt, Using default dict from collections import defaultdict ; d = defaultdict(dict) ; for user, item, value in df.values: d.setdefault(user, {})[item] = value –  falsetru Oct 31 '13 at 13:26

I think the operation you're after -- to unpivot a table -- is called "melting". In this case, the hard part can be done by pd.melt, and everything else is basically renaming and reordering:

df = pd.DataFrame(sample).reset_index().rename(columns={"index": "item"})
df = pd.melt(df, "item", var_name="user").dropna()
df = df[["user", "item", "value"]].reset_index(drop=True)

Simply calling DataFrame produces something which has the information we want but has the wrong shape:

>>> df = pd.DataFrame(sample)
>>> df
       user1  user2  user3
item1    2.5    2.5    NaN
item2    3.5    3.0    4.5
item3    3.0    3.5    NaN
item4    3.5    4.0    NaN
item5    2.5    NaN    1.0
item6    3.0    NaN    4.0

So let's promote the index to a real column and improve the name:

>>> df = pd.DataFrame(sample).reset_index().rename(columns={"index": "item"})
>>> df
    item  user1  user2  user3
0  item1    2.5    2.5    NaN
1  item2    3.5    3.0    4.5
2  item3    3.0    3.5    NaN
3  item4    3.5    4.0    NaN
4  item5    2.5    NaN    1.0
5  item6    3.0    NaN    4.0

Then we can call pd.melt to turn the columns. If we don't specify the variable name we want, "user", it'll give it the boring name of "variable" (just like it gives the data itself the boring name "value").

>>> df = pd.melt(df, "item", var_name="user").dropna()
>>> df
     item   user  value
0   item1  user1    2.5
1   item2  user1    3.5
2   item3  user1    3.0
3   item4  user1    3.5
4   item5  user1    2.5
5   item6  user1    3.0
6   item1  user2    2.5
7   item2  user2    3.0
8   item3  user2    3.5
9   item4  user2    4.0
13  item2  user3    4.5
16  item5  user3    1.0
17  item6  user3    4.0

Finally, we can reorder and renumber the indices:

>>> df = df[["user", "item", "value"]].reset_index(drop=True)
>>> df
     user   item  value
0   user1  item1    2.5
1   user1  item2    3.5
2   user1  item3    3.0
3   user1  item4    3.5
4   user1  item5    2.5
5   user1  item6    3.0
6   user2  item1    2.5
7   user2  item2    3.0
8   user2  item3    3.5
9   user2  item4    4.0
10  user3  item2    4.5
11  user3  item5    1.0
12  user3  item6    4.0

melt is pretty useful once you get used to it. Usually, as here, you do some renaming/reordering before and after.

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I think this should also be called unpivot... maybe in 0.13! :) –  Andy Hayden Aug 10 '13 at 13:10

I provide another possibility here using pd.stack:

df = pd.DataFrame(sample)
df = df.T.stack().reset_index()

Detailed explanations

In [24]: df = pd.DataFrame(sample)

In [25]: df
Out[25]: 
       user1  user2  user3
item1    2.5    2.5    NaN
item2    3.5    3.0    4.5
item3    3.0    3.5    NaN
item4    3.5    4.0    NaN
item5    2.5    NaN    1.0
item6    3.0    NaN    4.0

Applying stack will pivot the column axis on a sublevel of the row axis already indexed by item. As you want user first, let's do the operation on the transposed DataFrame by using .T:

In [34]: df = df.T.stack()

In [35]: df
Out[35]: 
user1  item1    2.5
       item2    3.5
       item3    3.0
       item4    3.5
       item5    2.5
       item6    3.0
user2  item1    2.5
       item2    3.0
       item3    3.5
       item4    4.0
user3  item2    4.5
       item5    1.0
       item6    4.0
dtype: float64

You expect basic columns and not index, so just reset the index:

In [36]: df = df.reset_index()

In [37]: df
Out[37]: 
   level_0 level_1    0
0    user1   item1  2.5
1    user1   item2  3.5
2    user1   item3  3.0
3    user1   item4  3.5
4    user1   item5  2.5
5    user1   item6  3.0
6    user2   item1  2.5
7    user2   item2  3.0
8    user2   item3  3.5
9    user2   item4  4.0
10   user3   item2  4.5
11   user3   item5  1.0
12   user3   item6  4.0
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This one is very similar to the meltsolution provided by DSM:

df = DataFrame(sample)
df = df.unstack().dropna().reset_index()
df = df.rename(columns={'level_0':'col1', 'level_1':'col2', 0:'col3'})
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You could try doing it like this perhaps.

temp=[]
for item in sample:
    temp.append(pandas.DataFrame(item))
self.results = pandas.concat(temp)
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1  
Thanks for quick response. When I try this, I get the following error Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module> File "pandas\core\frame.py", line 450, in init raise PandasError('DataFrame constructor not properly called!') pandas.core.common.PandasError: DataFrame constructor not properly called! –  Godel Aug 10 '13 at 12:43

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