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Is it possible to highlight text in an HTML document using without wrapping it with <span> or any other tag for that matter?

For example, in the HTML code <p>The quick fox</p> I would like to highlight quick but without adding a DOM element around it. Adding a DOM element to a parent element is fine.

Thanks!

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Why do you want to do this? –  DOK Nov 29 '09 at 18:33
1  
I would like to highlight (using bounding boxes) MULTIPLE search items. However, imagine the following 2 search items: "The quick" and "quick fox". If I highlight "The quick" by wrapping it, it will become a separate TEXT node and it would make it difficult to find "quick fox". One technique that I'm thinking of is: 1. Temporarily adding a <span /> element. 2. Finding the bounding box of the element (using offset(), width, height). 3. Deleting the above element. 4. Adding a box with the above dimensions to the container. Might work if the text is not wrapped around... –  bosh Nov 29 '09 at 19:09

4 Answers 4

No, it is not possible.

You can't tell the browser to render a piece of text differently without inherently changing the DOM, regardless of whether you do it statically or dynamically (with Javascript, for example, as a post processing step).

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You don't need to change the DOM if your changing pixels in a transparent canvas overlay. –  Eli Grey Nov 29 '09 at 21:34
    
How would you get the absolute position of a piece of text without changing the DOM? –  Mike Atlas Nov 29 '09 at 22:25
    
Add the <span> element to the DOM, find out its position, then delete it and normalize(). –  bosh Nov 30 '09 at 13:29
    
What if they resize the browser window? –  Mike Atlas Nov 30 '09 at 14:14
    
Naturally you will need to recompute on resizes. –  bosh Dec 2 '09 at 1:00

It is possible if you use an absolutely positioned element with a transparent repeating background image or a transparent background color (using rgba or hsla) and position it over the selected area.

Another way to do it would be to have an absolutely positioned canvas element without a background that takes up the whole browser viewport and draw a transparent rectangle over the selection.

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How would you get the absolute position of a piece of text without changing the DOM? –  Mike Atlas Nov 29 '09 at 22:21
    
Add the <span> element to the DOM, find out its position, then delete it and normalize(). –  bosh Nov 30 '09 at 0:04

It's not possible.

If you just want no tags in the original source code, it might be possible by adding tags later using Javascript magic. You could do something like

<p highlight="quick">The quick fox</p>

and write a JQuery/Prototype/plain JS function to highlight it on the fly, but what for and why? If you elaborate a bit, someone may come up with an idea.

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The only way to do this than I can imagine would be to use the <canvas> element, and render absolutely everything by hand.

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