Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have one default Thread in our main class but why we in main class do not extend Thread class. Is the reason that the Thread class is somehow included.

Here is what i mean, this is main class:

public class Test{

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Thread.currentThread().getName();

    }

}

and we use default Thread, but why in the start we didnt extend Thread class like this?

public class Test extends Thread {

     public static void main(String[] args) {

        Thread.currentThread().getName();

    }
}
share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Hovercraft Full Of Eels, duffymo, LuckyLuke, Raghunandan, JoseK Aug 10 '13 at 18:14

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
How would we know why you decided what you decided? –  bmargulies Aug 10 '13 at 16:14
    
1) Maybe it's me, but I find your question very confusing. Just what are you asking? What problem are you trying to solve? 2) For what it's worth, most will recommend that you almost never extend Thread, but rather if the need arises, implement Runnable. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 10 '13 at 16:16
    
Probably, to not scare off newbies. –  Ravi Thapliyal Aug 10 '13 at 16:16
    
Well the first part of code is default when we create a project. My question was, where we see in the code where is Thread class is extended? –  user16401 Aug 10 '13 at 16:16
1  
The only valid reason to extend Thread is to change underlying Thread behavior, for example to add logging. If you just want to create a new Thread with your own run behavior, use new Thread(myRunnable). The system has to supply at least a main thread, because you cannot run code to create a thread until you have a thread to run it in. –  Patricia Shanahan Aug 10 '13 at 16:21
add comment

3 Answers

You are confused a bit. All code runs in some thread, yet the class that defines this code needs not extend Thread. If this were not so, all classes had to extend Thread or you couldn't call any of their methods.

Look at the following analogy:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
         System.err.println("foo");
    }
}

Now ask yourself why Test does not extend System, and yet it uses fields and methods from System. If you know this, then you can also answer your original question.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah got it, it extends java.lang as default, right ? –  user16401 Aug 10 '13 at 16:21
1  
It extends java.lang.Object, but you're still confusing A extends B and A uses B. One can use things without extending them. Just like in the real world, you can play with a dog (call the Dog method play()) without yourself being a dog. –  Ingo Aug 10 '13 at 16:23
    
So in this case, we use Thread object and methods without extending them? –  user16401 Aug 10 '13 at 16:26
    
Exactly, so it is. –  Ingo Aug 10 '13 at 16:27
    
Ok, thank you.. –  user16401 Aug 10 '13 at 16:30
add comment

Whether its life or java , to use a thing you have no need to belong to the same hierarchy.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I would never, ever have a class extend Thread. There's no new behavior that you'll add.

Better to implement Runnable and give that class to a Thread or Executor to execute it for you.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.