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Here is the code I'm using in an MFC application to check for regular expression matches:

int CDouserApp::FindMatches(std::vector<std::wstring>& output, 
        const std::wstring& input, 
        const std::wstring& pattern)
{
    std::tr1::wregex rx(pattern);
    std::tr1::wsmatch results;

    output.clear();
    if (!(std::tr1::regex_search(input, results, rx)))
    {
        return 0;
    }

    for (auto& r : results)
    {
        output.push_back(r.str());
    }

    return output.size();
}

void CDouserView::OnClickedSearch()
{
    std::vector<std::wstring> ret;
    std::wstring pattern(this->regexList.GetWindowTextLength() + 1, 0);
    this->regexList.GetWindowText(&pattern[0], pattern.length());
    std::wstring input(this->inputEdit.GetWindowTextLength() + 1, 0);
    this->inputEdit.GetWindowText(&input[0], input.length());
    CDouserApp::FindMatches(ret, input, pattern);
    this->resultsList.DeleteAllItems();
    std::wstringstream resultsStatus;
    resultsStatus << ret.size() << " result(s)";
    static_cast<CMainFrame*>(::AfxGetMainWnd())->GetStatusBar()
        .SetWindowText(resultsStatus.str().c_str());
    for (auto& match : ret)
    {
        this->resultsList.InsertItem(LVIF_TEXT, match.c_str());  
    }
}

If I use <h(.)>([^<]+) and <h2>Egg prices</h2> as the input, I get 0 results even though it should match on "2" and "Egg prices". If I use Hello as the regular expression and Hello, world! as the input string, I get 0 results even though it should match on "Hello".

I've even tried converting the input and patterns to ASCII and use the non-wide std::regex family but the results are the same. The only pattern that has ever matched anything so far has been .* which matches the entire string.

I know the regex library for gcc is broken, but I've used std::regex before with MSVC and not had problems. I'd like to avoid using boost::regex or pcre if I can avoid it.

UPDATE/EDIT: This code works for some reason:

static void RegexTest(void)
{
    std::tr1::wregex rx1(L"<h(.)>([^<]+)");
    std::wstring input1(L"<h2>Egg prices</h2>");
    std::tr1::wregex rx2(L"Hello");
    std::wstring input2(L"Hello, world!");
    std::tr1::wsmatch results;

    if (!(std::tr1::regex_search(input1, results, rx1)))
    {
        ::MessageBox(nullptr, L"No matches found", L"Done", MB_OK | MB_ICONASTERISK);
    }
    else
    {
        std::wstringstream s;
        s << results.size() << " match(es) found:" << std::endl;
        for (auto& m : results)
        {
            s << m.str() << std::endl;
        }

        ::MessageBox(nullptr, s.str().c_str(), L"Done", MB_OK | MB_ICONINFORMATION);
    }

    if (!(std::tr1::regex_search(input2, results, rx2)))
    {
        ::MessageBox(nullptr, L"No matches found", L"Done", MB_OK | MB_ICONASTERISK);
    }
    else
    {
        std::wstringstream s;
        s << results.size() << " match(es) found:" << std::endl;
        for (auto& m : results)
        {
            s << m.str();
        }

        ::MessageBox(nullptr, s.str().c_str(), L"Done", MB_OK | MB_ICONINFORMATION);
    }
}

FINAL UPDATE (and solution):

After much analysis and testing, I discovered that I had to remove the null terminators from the strings:

void CDouserView::OnClickedSearch()
{
    std::vector<std::wstring> ret;
    std::wstring pattern(this->regexList.GetWindowTextLength() + 1, 0);
    this->regexList.GetWindowText(&pattern[0], pattern.length());
    pattern.resize(pattern.length() - 1);
    std::wstring input(this->inputEdit.GetWindowTextLength() + 1, 0);
    this->inputEdit.GetWindowText(&input[0], input.length());
    input.resize(input.length() - 1);
    CDouserApp::FindMatches(ret, input, pattern);
    this->resultsList.DeleteAllItems();
    std::wstringstream resultsStatus;
    resultsStatus << ret.size() << " result(s)";
    static_cast<CMainFrame*>(::AfxGetMainWnd())->GetStatusBar()
        .SetWindowText(resultsStatus.str().c_str());
    for (auto& match : ret)
    {
        this->resultsList.InsertItem(LVIF_TEXT, match.c_str());  
    }
}

The issue was that GetWindowText writes to the string while also adding a null terminator; the STL string considers this null terminator to actually be a part of the data. I don't know why Dinkumware has such a hard time with this extra null existing at the end of the input string. I haven't tested it with Boost yet to see if it shares the same pitfall but I suspect it doesn't.

share|improve this question
    
The regular expression looks correct, but with no actual text anywhere in the code to look at, it's really not possible to see what's going on. As always, start simple: write the regular expression as text in the code, and put the string to be searched as text in the code. If that doesn't work, then you've got something that someone else can look at and evaluate. –  Pete Becker Aug 10 '13 at 17:01
    
@PeteBecker: I just added a test case with patterns and input strings in the code itself. –  jvstech Aug 11 '13 at 11:56
    
Well, the new code works not "for some reason", but because it's correct. <g> Now you have a place to start, so change the working code into the non-working code a little bit at a time to see where things are going wrong. –  Pete Becker Aug 11 '13 at 13:22
    
I think I solved it and in doing so also think I discovered a bug in the Dinkumware regex implementation. I'll update my post to show it. –  jvstech Aug 11 '13 at 14:12
    
Glad you found it. One of the differences between C-style char arrays and C++ string objects is that the latter can have embedded nul characters. '\0' does not terminate the contents of std::string. –  Pete Becker Aug 11 '13 at 15:32

3 Answers 3

You are incorrect in thinking that the regex grouping symbols () will provide a match. That are used for backreferences. This will match something like "<h2>dsdsd". What you want is a regex expression that actually represents (in it's entirety) text inside the tag. Since I am not familiar with the regex flavour you are using... I cannot provide it for you.

All the best.

share|improve this answer
    
() defines a capture group, and each capture group forms part of the result of the regular expression match. They can also be used with back references. –  Pete Becker Aug 10 '13 at 16:58
    
@PeteBecker Yes, you are right - my experience is JS and it is used there in callbacks - but I didn't think he was using that sort of thing. Thanks for reminding me of that. good point. –  d'alar'cop Aug 10 '13 at 17:01

match function in regex doesn't work like that.

When you use regex <h(.)>([^<]+) and check match to string <h2>Egg prices</h2> the regex will check if the regex match the whole string, and in this case this will only match <h2>Egg prices not <h2>Egg prices</h2>(see the example here). If you want to detect inside the string contain some patern of regex, you should add wild character before and after that like .*<h(.)>([^<]+).*

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not using match. I'm using std::wregex_search. I understand that match matches the entire string, but search matches anywhere in the string. –  jvstech Aug 10 '13 at 17:46
up vote 0 down vote accepted

str.resize(str.length() - 1);

Removing the C-style null terminator from the string solves everything. It considered the null to be part of the actual expression pattern which was causing it to fail every time.

share|improve this answer

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