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Here is a simplified version of what I'm trying to do

class Firstclass
    {
    public:
    Firstclass(int x)
        {
        //do things with x;
        }
    };

class Secondclass
    {
    public:
    Secondclass()
        {
        Firstclass a(10);
        }

    void func()
        {
        //Do things with a
        }

    private:
    Firstclass a;
    };

So I have a class (Firstclass) with a constructor that takes an int argument. Now I'd like to create an instance of that class inside the constructor of another class (Secondclass).

The lines

private:
Firstclass a;

if what I'd do if a were just a variable instead of a class: mention it first such that I can use it elsewhere (in the function func() for instance). This doesn't seem to work with classes, because the compiler doesn't understand what the constructor of Secondclass is supposed to do.

How do I do this correctly?

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2  
Do you expect the instance of Firstclass to continue to exist after the Secondclass's constructor finishes? – NPE Aug 10 '13 at 17:08

Initialize it through the member-initializer list:

Secondclass() : a(10) { }

This is required because Firstclass doesn't have a default constructor. Also, in-class initialization with parameters gets ambiguated with a function declaration, so you can do it in the class body. In C++11, this is resolved with aggregate-initialization:

Firstclass a{10};
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2  
The reason it is required is because Firstclass does not have a default constructor. – juanchopanza Aug 10 '13 at 17:21
    
@juanchopanza ok changed – 0x499602D2 Aug 10 '13 at 17:37

FirstClass doesn't have a default constructor, so you need to use Secondclass' constructor initialization list:

Secondclass() : a(10) {}

C++11 allows you to initialize non-static data members at the point of declaration, so you can also do this:

class Firstclass
{
  ....
private:
 Firstclass a{10};
};

What you are doing here:

Secondclass()
{
  Firstclass a(10);
}

is wrong on two counts: 1) as I mentioned above, FirstClass has no default constructor, and by not initializing a in the initialization list, you are invoking its default constructor. 2) You are declaring a local variable a of type Firstclass, which only exists in the scope of the constructor body. This is not the same as your data member a.

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A way to do that correctly would be to use the constructor initialization list :

Secondclass) : a(10)
{
    // ...
}

The initialization list also lets you specify which constructor gets called for the objects that are fields of the class.

So instead of trying to initialize the Secondclass's member a with a default constructor who does not exist, by using the constructor initialization list you specify the constructor to be called.


There is a new way to do this since C++11. It is called aggregate-initialization. The syntax is :

T object {arg1, arg2, ...};

As in this case a is a non-static member of a class, so it will be copy-initialized.

Here is what the copy-initialization does in this particular case :

The constructors of Firstclass are examined and the best match is selected by overload resolution. The constructor is then called to initialize the object.

So if you want to use C++11, your class should look like :

class Secondclass
{
public:
    Secondclass()
    {
    }

    void func()
    {
        //Do things with a
    }

private:
    Firstclass a{10};
};

Just to point out another mistake :

Secondclass()
{
    Firstclass a(10);
}

You are not doing what you think here. Here you are declaring a variable a of type Firstclass who will only live in the constructor scope, it will be destructed at the end of the scope. It is not the same as the a member.

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