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A numerical integration is taking exponentially longer than I expect it to. I would like to know if the way that I implement the iteration over the mesh could be a contributing factor. My code looks like this:

import numpy as np
import itertools as it

U = np.linspace(0, 2*np.pi)
V = np.linspace(0, np.pi)

for (u, v) in it.product(U,V):
    # values = computation on each grid point, does not call any outside functions
    # solution = sum(values)
return solution

I left out the computations because they are long and my question is specifically about the way that I have implemented the computation over the parameter space (u, v). I know of alternatives such as numpy.meshgrid; however, these all seem to create instances of (very large) matrices, and I would guess that storing them in memory would slow things down.

Is there an alternative to it.product that would speed up my program, or should I be looking elsewhere for the bottleneck?

Edit: Here is the for loop in question (to see if it can be vectorized).

import random  
import numpy as np  
import itertools as it 

##########################################################################
# Initialize the inputs with random (to save space)
##########################################################################
mat1 = np.array([[random.random() for i in range(3)] for i in range(3)])
mat2 = np.array([[random.random() for i in range(3)] for i in range(3)]) 
a1, a2, a3 = np.array([random.random() for i in range(3)]) 
plane_normal = np.array([random.random() for i in range(3)])  
plane_point = np.array([random.random() for i in range(3)])  
d = np.dot(plane_normal, plane_point)  
truthval = True

##########################################################################
# Initialize the loop
##########################################################################
N = 100 
U = np.linspace(0, 2*np.pi, N + 1, endpoint = False) 
V = np.linspace(0, np.pi, N + 1, endpoint = False) 
U = U[1:N+1] V = V[1:N+1]

Vsum = 0
Usum = 0

##########################################################################
# The for loops starts here
##########################################################################   
for (u, v) in it.product(U,V):

    cart_point = np.array([a1*np.cos(u)*np.sin(v), 
                           a2*np.sin(u)*np.sin(v), 
                           a3*np.cos(v)])

    surf_normal = np.array(
            [2*x / a**2 for (x, a) in zip(cart_point, [a1,a2,a3])])


    differential_area = \
        np.sqrt((a1*a2*np.cos(v)*np.sin(v))**2 + \
        a3**2*np.sin(v)**4 * \
        ((a2*np.cos(u))**2 + (a1*np.sin(u))**2)) * \
        (np.pi**2 / (2*N**2)) 


    if (np.dot(plane_normal, cart_point) - d > 0) == truthval:
        perp_normal = plane_normal
        f = np.dot(np.dot(mat2, surf_normal), perp_normal)
        Vsum += f*differential_area
    else:
        perp_normal = - plane_normal
        f = np.dot(np.dot(mat2, surf_normal), perp_normal)
        Usum += f*differential_area

integral = abs(Vsum) + abs(Usum)
share|improve this question
    
Using np.random.random([3,3]) to generate mat1 etc, should shave off a bit of time. –  hpaulj Aug 11 '13 at 19:32
    
@hpaulj: All that stuff is outside the for loop and only needs to be done once. Also, in the real function mat1 and all the others are results of preceding calculations. I just used random here so I didn't have to include the preceding 300 lines of code... –  Eric Kightley Aug 11 '13 at 19:47
    
Testing shows that np.random.random ... does not make a difference in times. –  hpaulj Aug 13 '13 at 0:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If U.shape == (nu,) and (V.shape == (nv,), then the following arrays vectorize most of your calculations. With numpy you get the best speed by using arrays for the largest dimensions, and looping on the small ones (e.g. 3x3).

Corrected version

A = np.cos(U)[:,None]*np.sin(V)
B = np.sin(U)[:,None]*np.sin(V)
C = np.repeat(np.cos(V)[None,:],U.size,0)
CP = np.dstack([a1*A, a2*B, a3*C])

SN = np.dstack([2*A/a1, 2*B/a2, 2*C/a3])

DA1 = (a1*a2*np.cos(V)*np.sin(V))**2
DA2 = a3*a3*np.sin(V)**4
DA3 = (a2*np.cos(U))**2 + (a1*np.sin(U))**2
DA = DA1 + DA2 * DA3[:,None]
DA = np.sqrt(DA)*(np.pi**2 / (2*Nu*Nv))

D = np.dot(CP, plane_normal)
S = np.sign(D-d)

F1 = np.dot(np.dot(SN, mat2.T), plane_normal)
F = F1 * DA
#F = F * S # apply sign
Vsum = F[S>0].sum()
Usum = F[S<=0].sum()

With the same random values, this produces the same values. On a 100x100 case, it is 10x faster. It's been fun playing with these matrices after a year.

share|improve this answer
    
This is really great. I am still working through it. I believe X*Y[:,None] = np.transpose(np.outer(Y,X)). –  Eric Kightley Aug 13 '13 at 1:54
1  
np.outer does: a.ravel()[:,newaxis]*b.ravel()[newaxis,:]. A new function that appears to have a modest speed edge is np.einsum('i,j',X,Y). –  hpaulj Aug 28 '13 at 7:10

In ipython I did simple sum calculations on your 50 x 50 gridspace

In [31]: sum(u*v for (u,v) in it.product(U,V))
Out[31]: 12337.005501361698

In [33]: UU,VV = np.meshgrid(U,V); sum(sum(UU*VV))
Out[33]: 12337.005501361693

In [34]: timeit UU,VV = np.meshgrid(U,V); sum(sum(UU*VV))
1000 loops, best of 3: 293 us per loop

In [35]: timeit sum(u*v for (u,v) in it.product(U,V)) 
100 loops, best of 3: 2.95 ms per loop

In [38]: timeit list(it.product(U,V))
1000 loops, best of 3: 213 us per loop

In [45]: timeit UU,VV = np.meshgrid(U,V); (UU*VV).sum().sum()
10000 loops, best of 3: 70.3 us per loop
# using numpy's own sum is even better

product is slower (by factor 10), not because product itself is slow, but because of the point by point calculation. If you can vectorize your calculations so they use the 2 (50,50) arrays (without any sort of looping) it should speed up the overall time. That's the main reason for using numpy.

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I am looking for. I don't know how to vectorize my calculations (or how to vectorize at all, except in the case where I want to multiply UU and VV...). I have included my code in an edit to the question in the event that there is a simple way to vectorize it that you can recommend. –  Eric Kightley Aug 11 '13 at 19:07

[k for k in it.product(U,V)] runs in 2ms for me, and the itertool package is made to be efficient, e.g. it does not create a long array first (http://docs.python.org/2/library/itertools.html).

The culprit seems to be your code inside the iteration, or your using a lot of points in linspace.

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