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I have a list that looks like

alist = [a, b, c, d, e]

and I want to pass it to a function that looks like

def callme(a, b, e):
    pass

So, I would like to do something like

callme(*alist[0,1,4])

Is there a one liner that will achieve this?

EDIT

I could also do this, I guess (EDIT Don't do it this way, drewk has answered with a better method of enumeration.)

callme(*[a for a in alist if alist.index(a) in [0,1,4]])
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1  
callme(alist[0], alist[1], alist[4]) is still a one-liner and a lot more obvious. Is your objection to this the fact that you must write alist three times, so that, e.g., this would not work for callme(f()[0], f()[1], f()[4]) where function f has side effects? –  torek Aug 10 '13 at 21:12
    
@torek My reasoning is a bit convoluted but the gist is: I have to make a call to this function from multiple places, but the list in each place is stored differently - so it would be nice if I could just edit the indices. EDIT: Yes, also the fact that the lists might have different names in each location. –  sdasdadas Aug 10 '13 at 21:16
    
Ah, it makes much more sense that way. –  torek Aug 10 '13 at 21:17
    
@torek Your way is more responsive, though, if I want to substitute in an argument that doesn't come from the list. –  sdasdadas Aug 10 '13 at 21:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use operator.itemgetter:

from operator import itemgetter
callme(*itemgetter(0, 1, 4)(alist))
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Awesome, thanks - that's perfect. –  sdasdadas Aug 10 '13 at 21:15

You can also do this:

>>> alist = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e']
>>> [a for i,a in enumerate(alist) if i in (0,1,4)]
['a', 'b', 'e']
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Thank you, I didn't know I could enumerate like that. –  sdasdadas Aug 10 '13 at 21:24
2  
Note that this works better than the alist.index method in the question, as it behaves properly for duplicate values, e.g., alist=[0,1,2,3,3]; [a for a in alist if alist.index(a) in [0,1,4]] only outputs [0,1]. –  torek Aug 10 '13 at 21:24

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