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I have a View Controller with a normal View. In that view, I have 4 sub views. I need each one to react to a UISwipeGestureRecognizer. I hooked the views to the UISwipeGestureRecognizer in Interface Builder and hooked the UISwipeGestureRecognizer to an IBAction. It all works great; they all react to the UISwipeGestureRecognizer.

But, I need the action to do something different, depending on what view called the IBAction. What should I do? Here's the IBAction code:

- (IBAction)swipe:(UISwipeGestureRecognizer *)sender
{
    switch (view)
    {
        case view1:
            //do something
            break;

        case view2:
            //do something
            break;

        case view3:
            //do something
            break;

        default:
        //do something
        break;
    }
}

How should I handle this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
- (IBAction)swipe:(UISwipeGestureRecognizer *)sender
{
    if (sender.view == view1) {
        //do something
    }
    if (sender.view == view2) {
        //do something
    }
    if (sender.view == view3) {
        //do something
    }
}

Don't complicate what is simple. Besides, using tags will force you to define the same tags in another nib if you want to reuse the same controller with another nib, that is bad design.

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I disagree. I think it is worse design to unnecessarily hold references to some views to compare to sender. Especially if said views already have a property build into them that can be used to tell them apart. –  0x7fffffff Aug 10 '13 at 22:42
    
What exactly is wrong with keeping the references? The OS manages all of that for you as long as you have things correctly configured. –  David Carvalho Aug 10 '13 at 22:48

I would assign a tag to each of the views. That way, you can still use your switch statement to tell them apart, but without having to keep a reference to each view. E.x:

- (IBAction)tapSignature:(UISwipeGestureRecognizer *)sender
{
    NSLog(@"swiped");

    switch (sender.view.tag)
    {
        case 1:
            NSLog(@"1");
            break;

        case 2:
            NSLog(@"2");
            break;

        case 3:
            NSLog(@"3");
            break;

        default:
            NSLog(@"4");
            break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Ox7fffffff - That didn't work. The sender doesn't seem to have a tag. –  Cody Aug 10 '13 at 22:09
    
@Cody Right, but view attached to the sender can have one. You have to manually assign them in Interface Builder. –  0x7fffffff Aug 10 '13 at 22:11
    
Did that. default: NSLog(@"4"); is called. –  Cody Aug 10 '13 at 22:16
    
@Cody Are you sure you assigned the tags properly? Since the cases are 1,2 and 3, then 0 would trigger the default case, and 0 is the default tag. –  0x7fffffff Aug 10 '13 at 22:17

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