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Well , I know there are lots of question about scanf, but I still want to ask. I hope someone can explain the rules or principle for this issue:

code first:

   #include <stdio.h>

   int main()
   {
           int c = 'W';
           while(c != 'F'){

                   scanf("%c",&c);
                   printf("c is : %c\n",c);
           }
           return 0;
   }

And here is the output:

E
c is : E
c is :                  <--newline

G
c is : G
c is :                  <---newline again

W
c is : W
c is :                  <---newline 

F
c is : F

Well, I still can understand by now, for the newline I input stay in buffer and assignment c every time after alphabet a press.So , I try code2:

  #include <stdio.h>

   int main()
   {
           int c = 'W';
           while(c != 'F'){

                   scanf("%c\n",&c);   //<-- the only modified place.
                   printf("c is : %c\n",c);
          }
          return 0;
  } 

Then I get this screen:

E
G                        <---why the input and has one step before the output? 
c is : E         
W
c is : G
S
c is : W
C
c is : S
F
c is : C
R                       <---R was left in stdin, turn to a garbage, I didn't hope this. 
c is : F

I also have try to flush the stdin and stdout, still no use.

Note : I know if use scanf("%c",c);and another scanf("%c",&d); behind to deal with '\n' can fixed this, I just confuesed ,I hope to understand why the code2's issue happened.

I have check the answer before but I am not a really careful man , if this answer is really duplicate ,all downvote can be understand. :)

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
you would probably be better off using simply scanf("%c ",&c), which will skip past any and all trailing whitespace. –  Dave Aug 10 '13 at 23:31
    
When one uses \n at the format end of scanf(), its time to considerfgets() & scanf() instead. –  chux Aug 11 '13 at 4:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Passing any combination of consecutive white-space to scanf (including space, tab and new-lines, no matter what) means "read until first non-whitespace is occurred" (including EOF).

In your second example scanf reads the 'E', reads newline and still waits for non-whitespace to appear.

share|improve this answer
    
"In your second example scanf reads the 'E', reads newline and still waits for non-whitespace to appear.", you should specify that this statement is only true for his second example. –  Jacob Pollack Aug 10 '13 at 23:45
    
Sure, thank you for the catch. –  yeputons Aug 10 '13 at 23:47

So stdin (on your system definitely, and generally) is line-buffered, meaning that no input reaches the program until you hit "enter". This means that the program itself doesn't have to deal with "backspace" and such things.

When you use "%c\n", scanf is accepting a newline only after the input. If that's not there, it gets ignored.

As suggested in the comment, "%c " will skip "any whitespace" (newline, tab, space and formfeed, I believe, counts as "whitespace"). But you still aren't guaranteed to read "any input" as one character without something going in as the "unwanted input". scanf is definitely not great for reading human entered input. It is good for reading machine generated data, because it's flexible and can handle a bunch of different format, but for humans that type the wrong thing, etc, it's not that great. Either use fgets() (and perhaps sscanf to then parse the input, but at least you don't get "some stuff the user typed for this line, is left waiting to be read next time round" type of surprise" or use low-level, system dependent input functions, or a library like ncurses.

share|improve this answer
    
"%c " has no use , for newline. I have tryed. –  Lidong Guo Aug 10 '13 at 23:58
    
Like I said, it probably doesn't help much. scanf is simply not good for "human input". –  Mats Petersson Aug 11 '13 at 0:00
    
human input ~~ well you win. –  Lidong Guo Aug 11 '13 at 0:03

"\n" in scanf doesn't mean that a newline character is expected. You can find the explanation here: http://c-faq.com/stdio/scanfhang.html

share|improve this answer

I believe yeputons has provided the best explanation of the behaviour you're seeing, but to solve your actual problem (which surprisingly I didn't find on StackOverflow already), see this post: http://classes.soe.ucsc.edu/cmps012a/Fall98/faq/scanfQ.html

It suggests using scanf("%*[ \n\t]%c",&c);, which will skip all whitespace before the character. By skipping whitespace before instead of after the character, you're not left waiting on further input.

share|improve this answer
    
Would not a simpler scanf(" %c",&c) accomplish the same? BTW: [ \n\t] are not all whitespace character, but certainly common ones. –  chux Aug 11 '13 at 4:10
    
@chux I think that's the point: maybe the user is intentionally sending (say) a vertical tab. Depending on the use, you might even want to allow tab and space. But I'm posting it as a quote of the source. If I were to write it, I would do as you say and use a standard space (unless I had a special requirement) –  Dave Aug 11 '13 at 10:22

For the first example it's because scanf reads one character at a time from stdin. Since it does that, in terminal you will need to enter a whitespace character for scanf to begin extracting from the stream. So it looks like you are entering the following sequence:

E, (new line), G, (new line), ...

... and hence the output will be as it is in your example.

Similarly for your second example except you are reading in a character followed by a newline (scanf( "%c\n" ) as oppose to just a character -- however same reasoning.

Remark:

If you piped it the following text file:

EGJKF

... then it would have the output you expected:

c is : E
c is : G
c is : J
c is : K
c is : F
share|improve this answer

there is NOTHING wrong with scanf, when used appropriately.

For this problem try using a format of "%1s" and point c to a char field of length two and test c[0] for data.

The idea is that %s is more cognizant of white space.

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