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I am trying find a vectorized solution of updating vector b values based on values of vector a. The problem I have is this:

> # Vector a is the "driver" meaning if there is 1 or -1 in vector a
> # -1 or 1 needs to follow in vector b. The challenge I have is when 
> # I have 1 or -1 in a and in b I have two or more -1 or 1
> # then all but first same values in b should be set to 0 if values 
> # in a does not change
> a <- c(0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,-1, 0, 0, 1, 1,-1,-1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0,-1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0)
> b <- c(0, 0,-1, 0,-1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1,-1,-1, 1, 1, 0, 0,-1, 0, 0, 1, 0,-1,-1, 0,-1, 0)
> a
 [1]  0  1  0  0  0  0  0 -1  0  0  1  1 -1 -1  0  0  1  0  0 -1  0  1  0  0  0  0  0
> b
 [1]  0  0 -1  0 -1  0  0  0  0  1  1 -1 -1  1  1  0  0 -1  0  0  1  0 -1 -1  0 -1  0
> 
> # I need a vectorized function(a, b), if possible, that changes b 
> # based on a like below (removing some repeated values in b)
> # like below
> b[5] <- 0
> b[11] <- 0
> b[24] <- 0
> b[26] <- 0
> a
 [1]  0  1  0  0  0  0  0 -1  0  0  1  1 -1 -1  0  0  1  0  0 -1  0  1  0  0  0  0  0
> b
 [1]  0  0 -1  0  0  0  0  0  0  1  0 -1 -1  1  1  0  0 -1  0  0  1  0 -1  0  0  0  0

Any help/hint in how to do this in vectorized way highly appreciated.

I tried "standard" approaches using rle, cumsum, diff, ...

# I tried to play around with
test <- data.frame(
        a=a,
        b=b,
        a.plus.b=a + b,
        diff.a.plus.b=c(0, diff(a + b)),
        cumsum.a.plus.b=cumsum(a + b),
        diff.cumsum.a.plus.b=c(0, diff(cumsum(a + b)))
)
test 

rle(b)
rle(b)$values
rle(b)$lengths

Edit: Based on David request to be more clear about what I am trying to do I will explain in length the problem.

I am building simplified trading backtesting functionality (since quantstrat is to complex and to slow for my needs).

The problem above (at the top of the message) arises when I get an entry signal vector a above with values 1 (go long) or -1 (go short). After entry signal three things can happen (kept in vector b):
- a time stop is hit (exit at the end of day b==-1 if long and b==1 if short),
- a profit target is reached (again b==-1, b==1) or
- a stop loss triggered (again b==-1, b==1).

So vector b represents possible events/exits after each entry (there are no overlapping trades - one closes before another is entered). Sometimes the trades are going directly into my favour and we immediately hit profit target. Great. Sometimes we hit stop before we hit profit target. Sometimes neither stop is hit neither we reach profit target by end of day, so, we are left with end of day.

I need to remove all but the first exit events after entry (a==1 or a==-1). Since not all can/will happen, just the first (from time perspective) should stay and I should remove the subsequent ones.

Let me give an example. We enter a long trade at 9:31 (on close of a first minute regular trading hours bar). So a becomes:

a <- c(1, 0, 0, 0, 0, ..., 0)

We always exit at the close of last minute bar (time stop) so we add last possible exit to b:

b <- c(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ...,-1)

We also know that (in the backtest) that our profit target would already be reached on the the close of the bar at 9:35 so we add this fact to b (b[5] <- -1):

b <- c(0, 0, 0, 0,-1, ...,-1)

And, we also know (in the backtest) that a stop would trigger at 9:33 so we add this to b (b[3] <- -1) which now becomes:

b <- c(0, 0,-1, 0,-1, ...,-1)

So, since my profit target will never be reached (stop is hit before) and we will not be in the trade on the market close I should set b[5] <- 0 and b[length(b)] <- 0 . So, removing all but first exit triggers in b after entry (a==1). The b should become:

b <- c(0, 0,-1, 0, 0, ..., 0)

I need to process this for say thousand days in the past...

I hope this clarifies what I am trying to do.

share|improve this question
    
Are you trying to remove duplicates? there's a duplicate() function in R. –  Fernando Aug 11 '13 at 2:09
    
Thanks for the idea, but I think this will not solve my challenge. Look at the example under which conditions values in b should be set to 0 taking into account a. –  Samo Aug 11 '13 at 2:16
    
Can you provide a smaller example? there's too much numbers –  Fernando Aug 11 '13 at 2:22
    
Please just take first 6 elements of a and b. This is the first step. But also please see the middle part of vectors a and b since the example reveals under which condition repeatable numbers are fine. –  Samo Aug 11 '13 at 2:25
    
ok i'll try to look and understand your problem. But why b[8] is 0? –  Fernando Aug 11 '13 at 2:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure if I really understand what you're trying to do, but if do understand I think I have a vectorized solution for you.

> f <- function(a,b){
+   b[unique(c(which(a[-length(a)] == 0 & b[-1] != 0) + 1,which(b[-length(b)] == b[-1] & b[-1] != 0)))] <- 0
+   return(b)
+ }
> f(a,b)
 [1]  0  0 -1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 -1  0  1  0  0 -1  0  0  1  0  0  0  0  0  0

Here was my rational. I think you want to set values of b to zero based on two different scenarios:

1) When non-zero values of b repeat. If so this should find those indices:

which(b[-length(b)] == b[-1] & b[-1] != 0)

2) When non-zero values of b occur when the previous index of a was zero. If so this should do the trick:

which(a[-length(a)] == 0 & b[-1] != 0) + 1

Hopefully I didn't misunderstand your goals here.

EDIT:

Second try here. I'm still pretty sure that I don't understand what you're trying to do since my solution still flags b[10] (which you say it shouldn't), but from what you're writing the best I can understand is that you want to make the following changes:

Non-zero values of "b" that follow zero values of "a" must be set to zero.

Since this rule incorrectly flags b[10] can you please tell me why it is incorrect? I think this problem will need to be phrased that way in order for me to give you a solution since the finance talk just sounds like jibberish to me.

Anyway, here is the vectorized solution for the rule I listed.:

> f <- function(a,b) {
+   b[which(b != 0)[which(!which(b != 0) %in% (which(a[-length(a)] != 0) + 1))]] <- 0
+   return(b)
+ }
> f.indices <- function(a,b) which(b != 0)[which(!which(b != 0) %in% (which(a[-length(a)] != 0) + 1))]
> f(a,b)
 [1]  0  0 -1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 -1 -1  1  1  0  0 -1  0  0  1  0 -1  0  0  0  0
> f.indices(a,b)
[1]  5 10 11 24 26

EDIT: Third try is the charm...

Now operating under the assumption that goal is the set all non-zero values of b to be zero except for the first value that follows a non-zero value of a. I'm not sure if/how that can be fully vectorized, but here should a quick solution:

> a <- c(0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,-1, 0, 0, 1, 1,-1,-1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0,-1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0)
> b <- c(0, 0,-1, 0,-1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1,-1,-1, 1, 1, 0, 0,-1, 0, 0, 1, 0,-1,-1, 0,-1, 0)
> 
> f <- function(a,b){
+   #non-zero b indices
+   nz.b <- which(b != 0)
+   #non-zero a indices
+   nz.a <- which(a != 0)  
+   #non-zero b indices that do not follow non-zero a indices
+   nz.b.rm <- nz.b
+   for(i in nz.a){
+     nz.b.rm <- nz.b.rm[!nz.b.rm %in% nz.b[nz.b > i][1]] 
+   }
+   #print non-zero b indices that do no folow non-zero a indices
+   print(paste0("Indices Removed: ",paste(nz.b.rm,collapse=",")))
+   #remove non-zero b indices that do not follow non-zero a indices
+   return(b[-nz.b.rm])
+ }
> 
> b.new <- f(a,b)
[1] "Indices Removed: 5,11,24,26"
> b.new
 [1]  0  0 -1  0  0  0  0  0  1 -1 -1  1  1  0  0 -1  0  0  1  0 -1  0  0
share|improve this answer
    
David thanks. Good and smart ideas. However it is not completley correct. Only these values in my example of b need to be changed/set to 0: b[5], b[11], b[24], b[26]. All other especially the ones in the middle of vector b (from 12 to 22) are to be left alone. Let me give a simple example of what I want: # Different example a <- c(0, 1, 0,-1, 1,-1, 0, 0) b <- c(0,-1,-1, 0, 1,-1, 1, 1) # After applying function(a, b) b shuld become: # - b[3] <- 0 # - b[8] <- 0 b <- c(0,-1, 0, 0, 1,-1, 1, 0) –  Samo Aug 11 '13 at 9:22
    
Right, I don't understand why those values need to change though. If you can spell out the logic behind when values need to change more clearly then I can probably help but I can only spend so much time trying to figure out the question at-hand. –  David Aug 11 '13 at 14:27
    
David, I edited the initial post with more explanation. I hope it is more clear now. If you need more details I will of course provide them. Thanks. –  Samo Aug 11 '13 at 22:11
    
I tried again, but still don't think I understand. If you can correct my new "rule" that would be a big help but otherwise I just don't get what you want this function to do. –  David Aug 11 '13 at 23:55
1  
Ok, so the rule would actually be: "All non-zero values of 'b' must be set to zero except for the first value that follows a non-zero value in 'a'"? If that's true I can write something that does that, but I don't think it can be vectorized. –  David Aug 12 '13 at 14:56

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