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I have a problem with my syntax.

alarm = sound
off = sleeping
if alarm = off
print "I'm late for work"

What am I doing wrong?

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closed as off-topic by Josh Caswell, bmargulies, Cole Johnson, Junuxx, Carl Veazey Aug 11 '13 at 11:12

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1  
What are you trying to do and what happens when you do this? –  Josh Caswell Aug 11 '13 at 2:53
1  
So far, everything. What is sound? What is sleeping? If sound and sleeping are classes, have you defined __eq__ methods for them? Don't use '=' for a comparison. Use the correct syntax for an if statement. Indent the body of the if statement. –  Paul Tomblin Aug 11 '13 at 2:54
1  
flagged as low-quality question. If you're following along with a book or tutorial, there should be a section covering proper Python syntax (strings, if statements, etc.) –  omouse Aug 11 '13 at 3:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted
alarm = sound
off = sleeping

Python is trying to assign the variable alarm the value of the variable sound. You do not have a variable sound, thus you will get a NameError.

If you want them to be strings, you need to put quotation marks/apostrophes around the word:

alarm = 'sound'
off = 'sleeping'

Or

alarm = "sound"
off = "sleeping"

Now these variables are strings.


if alarm = off Is incorrect syntax for two reasons.

To compare for equality, the operator is == (that's two equals signs). = is used for assigning values to variables (as we have done above).

After this, you have to add a colon. This introduced a code block, which you must indent. Observe:

if alarm == off: # <--- colon here
    print "I'm late for work" # Notice the indentation
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I added else: print " I'm late for work" I forgot about the double equal sign and that I needed to add quotes for strings –  George Aug 11 '13 at 3:26

Try this:

alarm = sound
off = sleeping
if alarm == off:
    print "I'm late for work"

Notes:

  1. = is an assignment operator. == is the comparison for equality.

  2. : is required at the end of the if line.

  3. The commands in the body of the if must be indented.

Further information is here: http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/

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name 'sound' is not defined This is an example of how python is not using the 2 variables. I need these two set and I can't figure out how. –  George Aug 11 '13 at 3:02

This is the right way:

if alarm == off:
    print "I'm late for work"

Notice that:

  1. The print line must be indented after the line with the if
  2. The if line must end with :
  3. The correct way to compare for equality is using ==
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Like others have said, do it like this:

alarm = sound
off = sleeping
if alarm == off:
    print "I'm late for work"

You could also say

alarm = sound
off = sleeping
if alarm is off:
    print "I'm late for work"

but notice that == tests equality whereas is compares identity. For example,

>>> s1 = "Hello, World!"
>>> s2 = "Hello, World!"
>>> s1 == s2
True
>>> s1 is s2
False
>>> 
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