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I am using share memory to communicate between unrelated processes on linux. I want only the process which I specified in struct ipc_perm to have access to the shared memory. But seems the code takes no effect:

process A: creates the shared memory

      int main (int argc, char* argv[]){
          int segment_id;
          key_t key;
          key = 56789;

          char* shared_memory;
          int shm_size = 512;

          segment_id = shmget(key, shm_size, IPC_CREAT | 0666);
          if (segment_id < 0){
             perror("shmget");
             exit(1);
          }else {
             struct shmid_ds shmbuf;
             struct ipc_perm perms;

             //here i specified the process whose
             //uid is 1234 has the read/write access
             //to this shared memory
             perms.uid = 1234;
             perms.gid = 2000;
             perms.mode = 0660;

             shmctl(segment_id, IPC_STAT, &shmbuf);
             shmbuf.shm_perm = perms;
             int ret = shmctl(segment_id, IPC_SET, &shmbuf);
             if (ret < 0){
                 perror("shmctl IPC_SET");
                 exit(1);
             } 
           }

           shared_memory = (char*)shmat(segment_id, NULL, 0);
           if (shared_memory == (char*) -1){
              perror("shmat");
              exit(1);
           }

           sprintf(shared_memory, "Server Updated The Memory -PID- %lu", getpid());
           while(*shared_memory != '*')
               sleep(1);

           printf("The memory has been updated: \n   %s\n", shared_memory);
           sleep(5);
           shmdt(shared_memory);
           shmctl(segment_id, IPC_RMID, 0);
           return 0;
      }

process B: access the shared memory created by Process A

          int main(){
              int segment_id;
              key_t key;
              key = 56789;

              char* shared_memory, *s;
              int shm_size = 512;

              segment_id = shmget(key, shm_size, 0666);
              if (segment_id < 0){
                   perror("shmget");
                   exit(1);
              }

              shared_memory = (char*)shmat(segment_id, NULL, 0);
              if (shared_memory == (char*) -1){
                   perror("shmat");
                   exit(1);
               }

              for (s = shared_memory; *s != NULL; s++)
                     putchar(*s);
              putchar('\n');

              sprintf(shared_memory, "*Client Updated The Memory - pid-%lu", getpid());
              return 0;
          }

During my test, Process B always has read/write access to the shared memory created by Process A. why would this happen? (I am running on ubuntu, and opening two consoles to start the above processes resepectively.)

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Is the same user and/or group running both processes? Because you are setting the permissions to allow read/write to the user with ID 1234 and/or anyone in the group with ID 2000. –  Casey Aug 11 '13 at 4:03
    
@Casey I run these two processes on two different console. Is there anything wrong here? –  Steve Aug 11 '13 at 4:06
1  
If both processes have UID 1234, or GID 2000, then they should both have access to the shared memory segment. From the way the comment in the source says "the process whose uid is 1234" it would seem you are confusing the term UID (user identifier) with PID (process identifer). –  Casey Aug 11 '13 at 4:17
1  
@Casey yep, you are right. I tought different processes have different uids! I will learn more about uid and pid, and update this post late this afternoon. –  Steve Aug 11 '13 at 4:29
    
@Casey I mistaken the UID for PID. Now I wonder if there is a way for the creator to specify which process(es) it wants to authenticate to access the memory? Thanks for suggestion, if you post your comments as an answer I will accept it. –  Steve Aug 11 '13 at 5:21
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If both processes have UID 1234, or GID 2000, then they should both have access to the shared memory segment. Your comment in the source: "the process whose uid is 1234" seems to indicate you are confusing the term UID (user identifier) with PID (process identifer).

To my knowledge there is no way to restrict access to a shared memory segment to a specific set of processes by PID. Restricting to processes run by a specific user - by specifying that user's ID in the shm_perm.uid when calling shm_ctl(...IPC_SET...) - is generally good enough. If want to restrict the processes that can access the segment, restrict which processes you run that access the segment.

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