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So if you go to a bank there is a device from which you can pull a number out.

I want to write a function like that. So everytime this function is called we get a next number in the series.

So if this function is called first time, we get 1. second time we get 2.... so on and so forth.

this is what I have written so far

let X =
    let myseq = seq {1 .. 100}
    let GetValue = 
        Seq.head (Seq.take 1 myseq)
    GetValue;;

 let p = X;;
 p;;
 p;;
 p;;

But it always return 1. My hope was that since the sequence is a closure, everytime I do a take, I will get the next number.

I also tried this

let X =
    let mutable i = 1
    let GetValue = 
        i <- i + 1
        i
    GetValue;;

 let p = X;;
 p;;
 p;;
 p;;

This one only prints 2...

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2  
You need to make GetValue a function. –  ildjarn Aug 11 '13 at 4:45
    
It is considered bad practice to use mutable in a functional language. If you want to use mutable types, try c#. The spirit of "functions" are to take one input and give one output. If they modify something, that is known as a side-effect and is frowned upon. So, in short, iterators are not supported. Even a simple for loop is done through recursion. –  Phillip Scott Givens Aug 11 '13 at 5:24
    
@PhillipScottGivens - F# actually has quite strong support for imperative constructs including for / while and I don't see anything particularly wrong with this code. –  John Palmer Aug 11 '13 at 6:57
    
This scenario is a specific example of a more general multiple consumer and single producer. I would suggest to use MailboxProcessor for such cases, which would allow you to get rid of mutability - as the state can passed as parameter to the message loop - and it will also give you concurrency such that multiple consumers at the same time can ask for a value and still get unique value –  Ankur Aug 11 '13 at 7:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Just for a reference, if you wanted a version that uses sequences (just like the first approach in your question), you can do that using the IEnumerable interface:

let factory = 
  // Infinite sequence of numbers & get enumerator
  let numbers = Seq.initInfinite id
  let en = numbers.GetEnumerator()
  fun () -> 
    // Move to the next number and return it
    en.MoveNext() |> ignore
    en.Current

It behaves the same way as factory in Daniel's answer. This still uses mutable state - but it is hidden inside the enumerator (which keeps the current state of the sequence between MoveNext calls).

In this simple case, I'd use Daniel's version, but the above might be handy if you want to iterate over something else than just increasing numbers.

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ya, i was also thinking that an infinite seq would be good, there is even a good chance you might be able to do it with sequence comprehensions. –  Daniel Fabian Aug 11 '13 at 11:02
    
You could write a recursive sequence expression to generate numbers, but I guess initInfinite is simpler in this case :-) –  Tomas Petricek Aug 16 '13 at 15:52

You have to return a function. And to it, you have to pass something every time, i.e. your +1 has to be deferred.

let factory = 
    let counter = ref 0
    fun () -> 
        counter.Value <- !counter + 1
        !counter

and now you get

> factory();;
val it : int = 1
> factory();;
val it : int = 2

doing it this way has the nice side-effect, that you completely hide the mutable reference cell inside the function and thus there is no way to somehow tamper with your counter.

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Could also do incr counter. –  Daniel Aug 12 '13 at 14:27

You need to move the variable outside the declaration. You also need to declare a function so that it gets evaluated each time it is called.

let mutable i = 1
let X() =
    i <- i + 1
    i

This ensures that the function is called each time and that the variable is correctly incremented.

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