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Hi I am writing a script in bash which read the contents of files that have the word "contact"(in the current directory) in them and sorts all the data in those files in alphabetical order and writes them to a file called "out.txt". I was wondering if there was any way in which I could get rid of duplicate content. Any help would be appreciated

The code I have written so far.

#!/bin/bash

cat $(ls | grep contact) > out.txt
sort out.txt -o out.txt
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marked as duplicate by tripleee, anishsane, fedorqui, sgibb, max taldykin Mar 2 at 2:21

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4 Answers 4

sort has option -u (long option: --unique) to output only unique lines:

sort -u out.txt -o out.txt

EDIT: (Thanks to tripleee)

Your script, at present, contains problems of parsing ls output,

This is a better substitute for what you are trying to do:

sort -u *contact* >out.txt
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Thank you so much :) –  Anmol Wadhwa Aug 11 '13 at 6:00
    
Or better yet sort -u *contact* >out.txt to get rid of the unsightly parsing of ls output as well. –  tripleee Aug 11 '13 at 15:40

Use this using the uniq command (easier to remember than flags)

#!/bin/bash

cat $(ls | grep contact) | sort | uniq > out.txt

or the -u flag for sort like this

#!/bin/bash

cat $(ls | grep contact) | sort -u > out.txt
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Thank you so much :) –  Anmol Wadhwa Aug 11 '13 at 5:21
    
Most welcome @user2318535 :) –  woofmeow Aug 11 '13 at 5:23

uniq may do what you need. It copies lines from input to output, omitting a line if it was the line it just output.

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Thanks a lot :) –  Anmol Wadhwa Aug 11 '13 at 6:01

Take a look at the "uniq" command, and pipe it through there after sorting.

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Thanks for you hint! –  Anmol Wadhwa Aug 11 '13 at 5:22

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