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I've written a program where users can choose between two games to play: Pig or Snake. I tried to use the following code within my main method to create the appropriate kind of game:

if (gameType == 'p')
    PigGame game = new PigGame();
else
    SnakeGame game = new SnakeGame();

My compiler points to the second line and gives the error: not a statement

I have managed to fix the problem by writing an abstract class "Game" and then making PigGame and SnakeGame subclasses of it:

Game game;
if (gameType == 'p')
    game = new PigGame();
else
    game = new SnakeGame();

But I don't understand why the first construct didn't work. (I'm preparing to teach a high school programming course, but I'm new to Java and OOP so I can use any insights you can provide.)

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did you import the PigGame and SnakeGame files? also, try not naming them the same var name…try using pigGame or snakeGame as your variable name... –  user2277872 Aug 11 '13 at 5:12
    
Take a look at the following for some deeper understanding of the concept of block-scope in java: books.google.com/… Pay particular attention in the diagram to the places where it is indicated that variables go 'out-of-scope'. Hope that helps. –  David Tansey Aug 11 '13 at 5:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that the scope of game is inside the if and the else

if (gameType == 'p')
    PigGame game = new PigGame();
else
    SnakeGame game = new SnakeGame();

So you can't use it anywhere else, that's why your second piece of code works.

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Yes, that makes sense. I was fooled by the compiler error. It seemed that PigGame game = new PigGame(); was a statement. I would have expected an error farther down when I tried to use game again. –  user2625004 Aug 11 '13 at 5:24
1  
@user2625004 I would recommend that you use the coding standard of always using braces with for and if statements in your class. It helps new programmers (or new Java programmers) to identify and catch issues like these and to build a good mental model of variable scope. –  chrylis Aug 11 '13 at 6:20

"PigGame game = new PigGame();" is a declaration, not a statement. An if requires a statement, not a declaration. You could create a statement block containing it:

{
    PigGame game = new PigGame();
}

That would be syntactically correct. It would still be pointless, because game would be local to the statement block. You need game to be declared with a wider scope.

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It is actually a quite important issue

if (gameType == 'p')
    PigGame game = new PigGame();
else
    SnakeGame game = new SnakeGame();

does not compile only due to the Java grammar, which states that a variable declaration is not a statemant. In fact one could imagine a code, where he actually does not need this variable "game" and simply want to run constructors in if statement.

if (gameType == 'p')
    new PigGame();
else
    new SnakeGame();

and this will compile

if (gameType == 'p'){
    PigGame game = new PigGame();
}else{
    SnakeGame game = new SnakeGame();
}

this will also compile

Naturally in both cases - we do not have access to the variable outside the brackets, yet still, denying user to code it like

if (gameType == 'p')
    PigGame game = new PigGame();
else
    SnakeGame game = new SnakeGame();

is a bit arbitrary, and AFAIK aimed at making "sure" that user knows what he is doing. In general - score of variable is defined by its declaration surrounding brackets so if you write

{
Integer x=3;
System.out.println(x); //this works
}
System.out.println(x); //but this does not

and the same thing applies here - you can declare a Game object inside an if statement, but it would not be accseeible outside of it by the game variable. But it depends on your code, You could have something like

public class Game{
   public static Game lastCreatedGame;
   public Game(){
    lastCreatedGame=this;
   }
}

then, running

if (gameType == 'p')
    new PigGame();
else
    new SnakeGame();

would still give you access to the game, by Game.lastCreatedGame field

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This is the reason I request all newbies to not skip the curly braces because It gives a lot of clarity on scope.

When you make

if (gameType == 'p')
    PigGame game = new PigGame();
else
    SnakeGame game = new SnakeGame();

into

if (gameType == 'p') {
    PigGame game = new PigGame();
}
else {
    SnakeGame game = new SnakeGame();
}

the scope becomes clearer, both

PigGame game = new PigGame(); and SnakeGame game = new SnakeGame();

only exist within their respective blocks (i.e) within their respective curly braces,

so that means you cannot use game anywhere outside of their respective blocks, the compiler sees this and throws an error to help you out.

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