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[Python people: My question is at the very end :-)]

I want to use UTF-8 within C string literals for readability and easy maintainance. However, this is not universally portable. My solution is to create a file foo.c.in which gets converted by a small perl script to file foo.c so that it contains \xXX escape sequences instead of bytes larger than or equal to 0x80.

For simplicity, I assume that a C string starts and ends in the same line.

This is the Perl code I've created. In case a byte >= 0x80 is found, the original string is emitted as a comment also.

use strict;
use warnings;

binmode STDIN, ':raw';
binmode STDOUT, ':raw';


sub utf8_to_esc
{
  my $string = shift;
  my $oldstring = $string;
  my $count = 0;
  $string =~ s/([\x80-\xFF])/$count++; sprintf("\\x%02X", ord($1))/eg;
  $string = '"' . $string . '"';
  $string .= " /* " . $oldstring . " */" if $count;
  return $string;
}

while (<>)
{
  s/"((?:[^"\\]++|\\.)*+)"/utf8_to_esc($1)/eg;
  print;
}

For example, the input

"fööbär"

gets converted to

"f\xC3\xB6\xC3\xB6b\xC3\xA4r" /* fööbär */

Finally, my question: I'm not very good in Perl, and I wonder whether it is possible to rewrite the code in a more elegant (or more 'Perlish') way. I would also like if someone could point to similar code written in Python.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. I think it's best if you don't use :raw. You are processing text, so you should properly decode and encode. That will be far less error prone, and it will allow your parser to use predefined character classes if you so desire.

  2. You parse as if you expect slashes in the literal, but then you completely ignore then when you escape. Because of that, you could end up with "...\\xC3\xA3...". Working with decoded text will also help here.

So forget "perlish"; let's actually fix the bugs.

use open ':std', ':locale';

sub convert_char {
   my ($s) = @_;
   utf8::encode($s);
   $s = uc unpack 'H*', $s;
   $s =~ s/\G(..)/\\x$1/sg;
   return $s;
}

sub convert_literal {
   my $orig = my $s = substr($_[0], 1, -1);

   my $safe          = '\x20-\x7E';          # ASCII printables and space
   my $safe_no_slash = '\x20-\x5B\x5D-\x7E'; # ASCII printables and space, no \
   my $changed = $s =~ s{
      (?: \\? ( [^$safe] )
      |   ( (?: [$safe_no_slash] | \\[$safe] )+ )
      )
   }{
      defined($1) ? convert_char($1) : $2
   }egx;

   # XXX Assumes $orig doesn't contain "*/"
   return qq{"$s"} . ( $changed ? " /* $orig */" : '' );
}

while (<>) {
   s/(" (?:[^"\\]++|\\.)*+ ")/ convert_literal($1) /segx;
   print;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I seem to be too dumb to use this, getting the following output: "fo6 bar \x @ baz\t qux" /* foö bar — baz\t qux */, while reading from a filehandle with explicit PerlIO layers. –  amon Aug 11 '13 at 15:33
    
@amon, Sorry, I had run out of time to test. The bugs are now fixed. –  ikegami Aug 11 '13 at 19:40
    
Thanks a lot for everything. Will check the answers and respond later. Just a minor nit: There's a typo, missing a hyphen; the safe_no_slash range should rather be \x20-\x5B\x5D-\x7E. –  lemzwerg Aug 11 '13 at 20:01
    
@amon, @ikegami: I've finally time to comment on your suggestions. First of all, thanks a lot for your assistance! It really helps me if I compare my original code to your improvements. A minor question: Is there any specific reason to favor my($foo) = @_ over the shift operator, except for style? –  lemzwerg Aug 14 '13 at 12:41
    
@lemzwerg No, it is purely a style decision. But I prefer list assignment because of the visual similarity to named function signatures: Compare sub foo { my ($foo) = @_; ...} and sub foo { my $foo = shift; ...} to the pseudocode sub foo ($bar) {...}. Also, list assignment looks the same for any number of arguments, not just one. OTOH, shifting makes it slightly easier to supply default values. –  amon Aug 14 '13 at 13:00

Re: a more Perlish way.

You can use arbitrary delimiters for quote operators, so you can use string interpolation instead of explicit concatenation, which can look nicer. Also, counting the number of substitutions is unneccessary: Substitution in scalar context evaluates to the number of matches.

I would have written your (misnomed!) function as

use strict; use warnings;
use Carp;

sub escape_high_bytes {
  my ($orig) = @_;

  # Complain if the input is not a string of bytes.
  utf8::downgrade($orig, 1)
    or carp "Input must be binary data";

  if ((my $changed = $orig) =~ s/([\P{ASCII}\P{Print}])/sprintf '\\x%02X', ord $1/eg) {
    # TODO make sure $orig does not contain "*/"
    return qq("$changed" /* $orig */);
  } else {
    return qq("$orig");
  }
}

The (my $copy = $str) =~ s/foo/bar/ is the standard idiom to run a replace in a copy of a string. With 5.14, we could also use the /r modifier, but then we don't know whether the pattern matched, and we would have to resort to counting.

Please be aware that this function has nothing to do with Unicode or UTF-8. The utf8::downgrade($string, $fail_ok) makes sure that the string can be represented using single bytes. If this can't be done (and the second argument is true), then it returns a false value.

The regex operators \p{...} and the negation \P{...} match codepoints that have a certain Unicode property. E.g. \P{ASCII} matches all characters that are not in the range [\x00-\x7F], and \P{Print} matches all characters that are not visible, e.g. control codes like \x00 but not whitespace.

Your while (<>) loop is arguably buggy: This does not neccessarily iterate over STDIN. Rather, it iterates over the contents of the files listed in @ARGV (the command line arguments), or defaults to STDIN if that array is empty. Note that the :raw layer will not be declared for the files from @ARGV. Possible solutions:

  • You can use the open pragma to declare default layers for all filehandles.
  • You can while (<STDIN>).

Do you know what is Perlish? Using modules. As it happens, String::Escape already implements much of the functionality you want.

share|improve this answer
    
@ikegami Yes, I know. I purely use it to reject strings that are capable of holding codepoints that this implementation cannot handle. Of course it would be more elegant to something along the lines of s{([\P{ASCII}\P{Print}\\])}{my $h = sprintf '%X', my $c = ord $1; die "Can't handle high codepoint $h" if 0xFF < $c; sprintf '\\x%02X', $c}eg or what you did (encoding on the fly). –  amon Aug 11 '13 at 15:09
    
The problem is that you were rejecting perfectly acceptable strings in the process. I fixed it. –  ikegami Aug 11 '13 at 19:45
    
@ikegami Thank you for the improvement. Especially with regard to Unicode-related topics I have so much to learn, and am grateful for every correction. –  amon Aug 11 '13 at 20:16
    
(/[^\x00-\xFF]/ would also do the trick) –  ikegami Aug 12 '13 at 4:26

Similar code written in Python

Python 2.7

import re
import sys

def utf8_to_esc(matched):
    s = matched.group(1)
    s2 = s.encode('string-escape')
    result = '"{}"'.format(s2)
    if s != s2:
        result += ' /* {} */'.format(s)
    return result

sys.stdout.writelines(re.sub(r'"([^"]+)"', utf8_to_esc, line) for line in sys.stdin)

Python 3.x

def utf8_to_esc(matched):
    ...
    s2 = s.encode('unicode-escape').decode('ascii')
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, @falsetru! It's a pity that I only can mark one answer as the accepted one... –  lemzwerg Aug 14 '13 at 12:42

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