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Which Javascript framework (jQuery vs Dojo vs … )?

I have very short time to learn any JavaScript framework.

Considering the all-in-one solution factor, WebDevelopment-market and availability of written-books, Which should I learn JQuery or Dojo or ExtJS?

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Duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/394601/… –  cletus Nov 29 '09 at 22:00
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So you think the people who answered this question are all mads? –  BROY Nov 29 '09 at 22:18
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What exactly do you need? jQuery is clearly a king of gradual improvements, while Dojo is a federation of libraries covering a lot of things. Another thing would be licensing, which is different too: Dojo is under AFL/BSD, jQuery is under MIT/GPLv2, while Ext is GPLv3 + commercial. In short it means that you can use Dojo and jQuery for whatever you like, while Ext is free for open source projects compatible with GPLv3. –  Eugene Lazutkin Nov 30 '09 at 1:36
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marked as duplicate by cletus, tvanfosson, joshperry, Shog9, redsquare Dec 1 '09 at 7:11

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7 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

jQuery, hands down.

I have been developing in jQuery for the past year, and i think it blows the doors off Dojo, which happened to have been my first JavaScript library.

jQuery has everything you need: a css selector engine, animation, easy DOM manipulation and a heck of a lot more!

My favorite reference is Visual jQuery and of course check out the docs at jQuery Docs

Also, the Google Group is very active: jQuery Google Group

Good luck!

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Then what you say about, "JQuery is not as versatile as Dojo/Ext in terms of GUI". –  BROY Nov 29 '09 at 22:05
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Well, I said, "everything you need". ExtJS and Dojo are heavy hitters in their GUI arena. jQuery UI still has some catching up to do, but i think that for the all-around performance, jQuery does it. –  Jacob Relkin Nov 29 '09 at 22:14
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It depends on the project, doesn't it? Without a standard packaging solution jQuery is dead in the waters for any large-scale client-side project, and with its DOM-oriented API it is not useful for anything else, including server-side projects. –  Eugene Lazutkin Nov 30 '09 at 1:39
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jQuery UI has a few standard widgets but needs more standardization. The widgets and plugins themselves are quite awesome actually. Just that someone needs to package them into an enterprise framework. –  namespaceform Jan 6 '10 at 6:19
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I disagree with the answer. It is incomplete. The truth is that jQuery Dojo and ExtJS (and sproutcore and Cappuccino) are different kinds of tools. You should determine whether your project should behave like a website or a web application. If you want a website (with some controls maybe) use jQuery for a fullblown application it's just a way to waste money, you should use ExtJS or Cappuccino. If you don't you will arrive in plugin-bug-obsolete triangle of death. I am a jQuery user and fan but it is simply not strong enough to power a big web app. –  Gabor de Mooij Aug 4 '10 at 7:25
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dojo and extJS are kind of similar in the way of offering comprehensive layout framework. Having worked with both I find extJS much easier to live with. At the time I worked with it - about 3 years ago - dojo had a really horrible way of defining controls with templates in one directory and code file in another. It was a nuisance because it was hard to troubleshoot any problems with the layout/code interaction.

ExtJS has everything defined in javascript and the layout just works. I find it much better as everything is one place. They both offer same cross-browser wrappers for most of the functionality you need.

jQuery is different kind of beast is better suited for working with HTML that you define(I think). Not sure about layout capabilities - I think you still need to do a fair bit of your own HTML/CSS. The advantage of using jQuery is the terseness of syntax and the fact it's so light and unlikely to mess with other frameworks that you might want to use.

So to summarize between dojo and Ext - its Ext hands down. dojo just sucks. If you want to manipulate your own markup - definitely jQuery.

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But JQuery don't offer rich GUI library. –  BROY Nov 29 '09 at 22:10
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That's my impression. I think you can build anything in jQuery that you can in Ext but you have to get all different plugins. Ext has most of the UI you'll ever want integrated. –  Igor Zevaka Nov 29 '09 at 22:14
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Lot's of downvotes, yay!!! I guess I shouldn't have dared to not give jQuery a glowing review and recommend it for all applications. –  Igor Zevaka Nov 30 '09 at 2:38
    
That will teach you ;) –  RedBlueThing Nov 30 '09 at 3:31
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@peller Giving accurate information while disclosing the last time he worked on it should rate well. –  Workman Aug 15 '11 at 19:12
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If you are going to be replacing desktop applications with web applications, it is Dojo by a mile. If you want to sprinkle in some dynamic functionality to web pages, then I would go with JQuery. Dojo had a rewrite from 0.4 to 0.9 that improved allot of items in the toolkit. As well, it is by far the most robust framework for building browser based applications With Persons with Disabilities, internationalization and keyboard navigation built in. It is more complicated to learn, but once mastered, by far the easiest to build large scale browser applications. I have also found that it disciplined API's lend itself well to larger team efforts, than the other frameworks. It is very easy to break the problem set up into widgets, have developers build the widgets as black boxes and then allow the designers to insert the Dojo widget tags into the HTML. If you are going to be working with team larger that a few people, I find that it is easier with Dojo's architecture to black box problems and have individual developers work on them. So, in the end it comes down to your problem set, if it is small and you need to be quick then JQuery. If you are replacing a day trading application then Dojo. Ext/JS does not have a license that I am comfortable with for a toolkit, so I cannot comment.

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jQuery is by far the most popular of the three (easy to check -- everything from number of search hits, to tags in SO, confirms that!). This leads to a presumption in superiority for all of your chosen metrics, so that's what I would recommend, given your stated standards.

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What is your thought about rich widgets of Dojo/Ext ? –  BROY Nov 29 '09 at 22:07
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jQueryUI is pretty cool. Don't be alarmed at the "large" download size. The core UI file is only about 8k. Its the theming engine that adds the size to their download estimate. –  Doug Neiner Nov 29 '09 at 22:12
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@JMSA, personally, I love Dojo -- but it just isn't anywhere as popular as jQuery! Google's recently open-sourced Closure (code.google.com/closure) is also good (and I'm biased towards it, of course;-), but having been open-sourced 3 weeks ago it can't of course yet come anywhere near competing, in popularity, books, etc, with the frameworks that have been open-sourced for years, so, by your criteria, it's not even "in the race";-). –  Alex Martelli Nov 29 '09 at 22:24
    
@Alex thanks for mentioning closure! –  Evgeny Nov 30 '09 at 4:21
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I started out learning ext but when I found out about Jquery i gave it a try and now I haven't used ext since.....

jquery is much easyer....

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Hey nobody is passing any comment about JQuery's poor GUI library. –  BROY Nov 29 '09 at 22:12
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you're right.. that's the only thing that's still missing in jquery... I don't use those much =( but for people that like ext gui they'll miss it.. i think... –  mars Nov 29 '09 at 22:22
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check samples from jqueryui.com for GUI library

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Not really a "GUI library" -- more like a small collection of UI utilities. You're not going to be building a desktop-style app with jQuery without a LOT of extra work (if that's the goal -- if not, more power to you). –  bmoeskau Nov 30 '09 at 3:43
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