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I'm trying to make use of a parent class to reuse in multiple inheriting classes, but the parent class needs to have an instance variable to work.

public class Num {
    private int a = 1;

    public int calc() {
        int c = a + 4;
        return c;
    }
}

public class Two extends Num {
    private int a = 2;
}

The main difference between each of the child classes is the value of their instance variable. Is there way that Two can still utilize the calc() code from the generic class Num without overriding it simply by setting the "a" parameter to its own value, or am I going about this in entirely the wrong way?

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read about passing parameters in methods and how to define define get; set; –  Ashwin Aug 11 '13 at 6:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Put the initialization of "a" in the constructor and make it protected:

public class Num {
    protected int a;

    public Num() { a = 1; }

    public int calc() {
        int c = a + 4;
        return c;
    }
}

public class Two extends Num {
    public Two() { a = 2; }
}
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Just a trick, passing a as the input param to the method should help you:

   public int calc(int a) {
        int c = a + 4;
        return c;
    }

I think even if you don't do it, then using this should use the value of a of the calling object:

public int calc() {
    int c = this.a + 4;
    return c;
}
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Add protected getter for a, then it will something like a template method:

public class Num {
        public int calc() {
            int c = getA()+ 4;
            return c;
        }

        protected int getA() {
            return 1;
        }
    }

    static class Two extends Num {
        @Override
        protected int getA() {
            return 2;
        }
    }
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Making a protected is not the most encapsulated way of doing it. If you put the initialization of a inside the constructor of Num then Two can call that constructor as well. Reusing it's logic.

public class Num {
    private final int a;

    public Num(int a) { 
        this.a = a; 
    }

    public int calc() {
        return a + 4;
    }
}

public class Two extends Num {
    public Two(int a) {
        super(a);
    }
}
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