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I've created a test data set to reproduce this problem:

Date    Percent
2012-01 3.00%
2012-02 43.00%
2012-03 54.00%
2012-04 43.00%
2012-05 43.00%
2012-06 23.00%
2012-07 12.00%
2012-08 
2012-09 
2012-10 
2012-11 
2012-12 

These percentages were created by inputting decimal values in a csv file and converting the format of the Percent column into Percentage via Microsoft Excel.

When I try to graph this dataset with ggplot

data <- read.csv("GCdataViz/test2.csv")
p <- ggplot(data, aes(x=Date, y=Percent, group=1)) + 
  geom_point(size = 3) 
p

I get this graph

enter image description here

As you can see the null values are plotted, and the Y axis is also odd... The 3% datapoint is plotted above the 23%. It seems ggplot doesn't do too well with standardizing axes with percentages. is there a way I can set the correct range for the Y axis assuming I DO NOT KNOW the percentage values (assuming I am abstracted to the actual dataset other than it is a Percent column).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The column Percent is a factor. By default, factor labels are orderer alphabetically. Hence, 3.00% comes after 12.00%. It will work if you transform the values of Percent to numeric values:

The data:

data <- read.table(text = "Date    Percent
2012-01 3.00%
2012-02 43.00%
2012-03 54.00%
2012-04 43.00%
2012-05 43.00%
2012-06 23.00%
2012-07 12.00%
2012-08 
2012-09 
2012-10 
2012-11 
2012-12 ", header = TRUE, fill = TRUE)

Create a new variable, Percent2, with numeric values:

data <- transform(data,
                  Percent2 = replace(as.numeric(gsub("%", "", Percent)),
                                     Percent == "", 0))

#       Date Percent Percent2
# 1  2012-01   3.00%        3
# 2  2012-02  43.00%       43
# 3  2012-03  54.00%       54
# 4  2012-04  43.00%       43
# 5  2012-05  43.00%       43
# 6  2012-06  23.00%       23
# 7  2012-07  12.00%       12
# 8  2012-08                0
# 9  2012-09                0
# 10 2012-10                0
# 11 2012-11                0
# 12 2012-12                0

Plot:

library(ggplot2)
ggplot(data, aes(x = Date, y = Percent2)) + 
  geom_point(size = 3) 

enter image description here

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Is there anyway to check if a column is a percent? They way my program works the user chooses his x and y axis and the plot modifies according to his choice. So in my code I don't know if he'll pick the percent column or another column. If I can check whether a column is a percent, then I can use the replace() method. I realize I did not specify this in the original post. –  jeffrey Aug 11 '13 at 17:26
    
@user2649452 What is the structure of the other column the user can choose? –  Sven Hohenstein Aug 11 '13 at 17:46
    
The other columns will be numeric, or there could be multiple percent columns. –  jeffrey Aug 11 '13 at 18:02
    
@user2649452 If the column is numeric, you don't need to modify it. –  Sven Hohenstein Aug 11 '13 at 18:18
1  
@user2649452 You can use as.numeric(x), where x is your column. It returns TRUE or numeric columns and FALSE for factors (percentages). You could also use if.factor(x). For example: if (is.factor(x)) .... –  Sven Hohenstein Aug 11 '13 at 18:38

Sven's answer gets OP most of the way home, but I believe OP does not want any points at all plotted for the values that were blank in the original Excel sheet. This can be accomplished one of two ways:

  • Use Sven's solution, followed by data$Percent2[data$Percent2==0] <- NA. (This will fail if you have real percent values that are equal to zero, as well as blank values.)

  • Better, in my opinion: When you save the original Excel sheet as a .csv file, make sure the Percentage column is formatted as Number (i.e., Format -> Cells and choose Number.) Make sure to include as many decimal places as are useful, since the exported text file will only have as many decimal places as you see on screen. For instance, a cell with value =1/3 will be exported as 0.3 if you only display one decimal place. Obviously you'll need to multiply by 100 in order to have R display percentage values rather than decimal fractions. R will import the blank spaces as NA, and you won't have to do any further processing.

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1  
Oh I see, basically the csv file will have a numerical value (0.3) and when I import the file, I can multiply every row in that column by 100 (with ddply), so ggplot will order it as numeric, correct? that means I can completely sidestep creating a factor. –  jeffrey Aug 11 '13 at 17:15
    
The only problem with this is that I do not know what column the user will pick as the Y axis (he could pick a Percent column or another normal numeric column). So I'm afraid this would not work for me. I realize I didn't specify that I wouldn't know which column the user would pick. –  jeffrey Aug 11 '13 at 17:37
    
I'm afraid I don't understand your underlying problem. Who is the user (not you?) & at what point in the workflow are they involved? –  Drew Steen Aug 11 '13 at 22:10

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