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I have a generic Dictionary

class GenericDictionary<TKey, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
    Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary = new Dictionary<TKey,TValue>();

    public void AddToGenericDictionary(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        dictionary.Add(key, value);
    }
}

I have declared a Class

class GenericInput1
 {
     public string Name { get; set; }
 }

In the main function, I have initialized the GenericInput1 class and Added into the GenericDIctionary

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
         GenericInput1 inp1 = new GenericInput1 { Name = "An" };
         GenericInput1 inp2 = new GenericInput1 { Name = "B" };
         GenericInput1 inp3 = new GenericInput1 { Name = "C" };

         GenericDictionary<int, GenericInput1> genericIntKey = new GenericDictionary<int, GenericInput1>();

         genericIntKey.AddToGenericDictionary(1, inp1);
         genericIntKey.AddToGenericDictionary(2, inp2);
         genericIntKey.AddToGenericDictionary(3, inp3);

         GenericInput1 result2 = genericIntKey[3];
         Console.WriteLine(result2.Name);
    }
}

When I run the Program, it gives me the following exception :

Unhandled Exception: System.Collections.Generic.KeyNotFoundException: The given key was not present in the dictionary.

But If I try to add to generic dictionary using the built-in Add method, the program runs well.

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2  
Why do you create a class GenericDictionary when the Dictionary<TKey,TValue> is already generic? –  Tim Schmelter Aug 11 '13 at 9:50
    
@TimSchmelter - Actually I am at a very basic level of Generic Classes. So, I thought of having a Generic Dictionary also. Following your comment, I would like to ask you another question to clear my concept on this issue. We know List<T> itself is also generic and we can use it inside a generic class to add any type of objects. What is the main purpose of generic classes? –  Yeasin Abedin Siam Aug 11 '13 at 10:09
    
This question is too broad to be answered in a comment. Have you read MSDN? However, since you know why generic lists or dictionaries are useful(because you can use them with any types but still type-safe at compile-time), the same benefits has a custom generic class. –  Tim Schmelter Aug 11 '13 at 10:13
2  
I suggest that you google inheritance vs. delegation, since you have them confused. –  Jim Balter Aug 11 '13 at 10:31
    
"We know List<T> itself is also generic and we can use it inside a generic class to add any type of objects. " -- No, you can only add objects of type T, whatever T is ... and you must specify it. –  Jim Balter Aug 11 '13 at 10:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try changing your code to

class GenericDictionary<TKey, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey, TValue>
{

    public void AddToGenericDictionary(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        this.Add(key, value);
    }
}

When overriding the dictionary, you do not need to implement the backing store.

But if you wish to implement your own Dictionary, have a look at IDictionary Interface

Represents a generic collection of key/value pairs.

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2  
It's worth noting that a) this. isn't needed and b) the OP has inheritance and delegation confused. –  Jim Balter Aug 11 '13 at 10:40

You are inheriting from Dictionary, so you don't need a backing field Dictionary in your class. So remove it and use the parent dictionary:

class GenericDictionary<TKey, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
    Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary = new Dictionary<TKey,TValue>();

    public void AddToGenericDictionary(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        dictionary.Add(key, value);
    }
}

to

class GenericDictionary<TKey, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
    public void AddToGenericDictionary(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        this.Add(key, value);
    }
}
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