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I was wondering whether there's a way to override a function for a specific instance only. For ex,

class A
{
public:
    ...
    void update();
    ...
}

int main()
{
    ...
    A *first_instance = new A();
    // I want this to have a specific update() function.
    // ex. void update() { functionA(); functionB(); ... }

    A *second_instance = new A();
    // I want this to have a different update() function than the above one.
    // ex. void update() { functionZ(); functionY(); ...}

    A *third_instance = new A();
    // ....so on.
    ...
}

Is there a way to achieve this?

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3  
Why can't you just define update() as virtual, and then define a child class that overrides it? –  Oli Charlesworth Aug 11 '13 at 10:41
1  
Why differentiate based on an instance when they should be different types? –  chris Aug 11 '13 at 10:41
    
I was going to define child classes for each of them, but i was wondering if there's another way. –  Chaewon Lee Aug 11 '13 at 10:44
4  
This is known as an XY problem. What are you trying to do? –  Dave Aug 11 '13 at 10:49
    
Scala and some other rich languages has objects that can have their own methods ... C++ doesn't. –  Jim Balter Aug 11 '13 at 11:03
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I think virtual function is just what you want, with virtual function, different instances of the same type can have different functions, but you need to inherit the base class. for example

class A
{
    public:
        ...
        virtual void update()
        {
            std::cout << "Class A\n";
        }
        ...
};

class B: public A
{
    public:
        virtual void update()
        {
            std::cout << "Class B\n";
        }
};

class C: public A
{
    public:
        virtual void update()
        {
            std::cout << "Class C\n";
        }            

};

int main()
{
    ...
    A *first_instance = new A();
    // I want this to have a specific update() function.
    // ex. void update() { functionA(); functionB(); ... }

    A *second_instance = new B();
    // I want this to have a different update() function than the above one.
    // ex. void update() { functionZ(); functionY(); ...}

    A *third_instance = new C();
    // ....so on.
    ...
}

each instance in the above code will bind different update functions.

Besides, you can also use function pointer to implement your requirement, but it is not recommended. For example

class A
{
    public:
        A(void(*u)())
        {
            this->update = u;
        }
        ...
        void (*update)();
};

void a_update()
{
    std::cout << "update A\n";
}

void b_update()
{
    std::cout << "update B\n";
}

void c_update()
{
    std::cout << "update C\n";
}

int main()
{
    ...
    A first_instance(a_update);
    // I want this to have a specific update() function.
    // ex. void update() { functionA(); functionB(); ... }

    A second_instance(b_update);
    // I want this to have a different update() function than the above one.
    // ex. void update() { functionZ(); functionY(); ...}

    A third_instance(c_update);
    // ....so on.
    ...
}

Hope helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer.. I was actually going to do this in the first place, but I didn't like to create about 50 child classes just for different update() functions... I guess there's no other way. –  Chaewon Lee Aug 11 '13 at 10:50
    
@ChaewonLee "I guess there's no other way": there almost certainly is, if you'd explain what you're trying to do. –  Dave Aug 11 '13 at 10:54
    
@ChaewonLee , I have just updated my answer, there is another way to implement your requirement, that is function pointer, please check out, ;) –  Hanfeng Aug 11 '13 at 10:55
    
50 classes - you are joking. As you are not specific as to what you are trying to achieve it is impossible to give a good solution. You have heard of maps/lists/variables etc.? –  Ed Heal Aug 11 '13 at 10:58
    
@Hanfeng Whats wrong with funciton pointers ("... it is not recommended...") ?? –  ted Aug 11 '13 at 11:05
show 7 more comments

Hold a function in the class.

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

using namespace std;

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo(const function<void ()>& f) : func(f)
    {
    }

    void callFunc()
    {
        func();
    }
private:
    function<void ()> func;
};

void printFoo() { cout<<"foo"<<endl; }
void printBar() { cout<<"bar"<<endl; }

int main()
{
    Foo a(printFoo);
    Foo b(printBar);
    a.callFunc();
    b.callFunc();
}
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1  
Note, that this requires C++11. For C++03, boost provides an implementation of function. –  user2671945 Aug 11 '13 at 11:01
    
Something should be held in the class instances, but without more detail from the OP we can't know what is needed. –  Jim Balter Aug 11 '13 at 11:09
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You may have noticed that the end brace of a class is often followed by a semicolon, whereas the end braces of functions, while loops etc don't. There's a reason for this, which relates to a feature of struct in C. Because a class is almost identical to a struct, this feature exists for C++ classes too.

Basically, a struct in C may declare a named instance instead of (or as well as) a named "type" (scare quotes because a struct type in C isn't a valid type name in itself). A C++ class can therefore do the same thing, though AFAIK there may be severe limitations on what else that class can do.

I'm not in a position to check at the moment, and it's certainly not something I remember using, but that may mean you can declare a named class instance inheriting from a base class without giving it a class name. There will still be a derived type, but it will be anonymous.

If valid at all, it should look something like...

class : public baseclass  //  note - no derived class name
{
  public:
    virtual funcname ()
    {
      ...
    }
} instancename;

Personally, even if this is valid, I'd avoid using it for a number of reasons. For example, the lack of a class name means that it's not possible to define member functions separately. That means that the whole class declaration and definition must go where you want the instance declared - a lot of clutter to drop in the middle of a function, or even in a list of global variables.

With no class name, there's presumably no way to declare a constructor or destructor. And if you have non-default constructors from the base class, AFAIK there's no way to specify constructor parameters with this.

And as I said, I haven't checked this - that syntax may well be illegal as well as ugly.

Some more practical approaches to varying behaviour per-instance include...

  1. Using dependency injection - e.g. providing a function pointer or class instance (or lambda) for some part of the behavior as a constructor parameter.

  2. Using a template class - effectively compile-time dependency injection, with the dependency provided as a function parameter to the template.

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1  
You can even use this within a new statement: new (class : public baseclass { public: virtual funcname () { ... } }); –  JohnB Aug 11 '13 at 11:49
    
@JohnB - that's interesting. And a bit scary. –  Steve314 Aug 11 '13 at 12:01
    
Obviously, it's non-standard, but rather a bug in gcc 4.6.3: stackoverflow.com/questions/18171684/anonymous-classes –  JohnB Aug 13 '13 at 14:07
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You can use local classes, yet, personally, I consider the "hold function in the class" approach mentioned in the other answer better. I'd recommend the following approach only if doFunc must access internals of your base class, which is not possible from a function held in a member variable:

class ABase {
public:
    void Func () { this->doFunc (); }
private:
    virtual void doFunc () = 0;
public:
    virtual ~ABase () { }
};

ABase* makeFirstA () {
    class MyA : public ABase {
        virtual void doFunc () { std::cout << "First A"; }
    };
    return new MyA;
}

ABase* makeSecondA () {
    class MyA : public ABase {
        virtual void doFunc () { std::cout << "Second A"; }
    };
    return new MyA;
}

int main () {
    std::shared_ptr<ABase> first (makeFirstA ());
    std::shared_ptr<ABase> second (makeSecondA ());
    first->Func ();
    second->Func ();
}

From a design patterns point of view, the "local classes" approach implements the template method pattern, while the "hold a function(al) in a member variable" approach reflects the strategy pattern. Which one is more appropriate depends on what you need to achieve.

share|improve this answer
    
A function held in a variable can access the internals of your class by the simple method of passing an argument ... you could access the whole shebang by passing this if appropriate access is given. And C++11 provides closures, which can capture ("close over") references to any needed content. –  Jim Balter Aug 11 '13 at 21:50
    
That's the usual inheritance-vs-composition decision. By passing this you can give the function access only to the public interface of the class, yet not to the protected one. I do not see how closures should help here. –  JohnB Aug 13 '13 at 14:01
    
What are some heuristic criteria for deciding which to use based upon suspected likely design goals of this code? –  Andyz Smith Aug 13 '13 at 15:13
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I think it will be the best if you'll tell us why do you need to override a function for a specific instance.
But here's another approach: Strategy pattern.

Your class need a member that represent some behaviour. So you're creating some abstract class that will be an interface for different behaviours, then you'll implement different behaviours in subclasses of that abstract class. So you can choose those behaviours for any object at any time.

class A;//forward declaration

class Updater
{
public:
    virtual ~Updater() {};//don't forget about virtual destructor, though it's not needed in this case of class containing only one function
    virtual void update(A&) = 0;
}

class SomeUpdater
{
public:
    virtual void update(A & a);//concrete realisation of an update() method
}

class A
{
private:
    Updater mUpdater;
public:
    explicit A(Updater updater);//constructor takes an updater, let's pretend we want to choose a behaviour once for a lifetime of an object - at creation
    void update()
    {
        mUpdater.update(this);
    }
}
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