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Trying to create Tkinter window using super(). I get this error:

super(Application, self)._init_(master) TypeError: must be type, not classobj

Code:

import Tkinter as tk

class Application(tk.Frame):

    def __init__(self, master):
        super(Application, self).__init__(master)
        self.grid()


def main():
    root = tk.Tk()
    root.geometry('200x150')
    app = Application(root)

    root.mainloop()


main()
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Tkinter uses old-style classes. super() can only be used with new-style classes.

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So what I should do is to do this: tk.Frame.__init__(self, master) instead of super()? –  user1121487 Aug 11 '13 at 11:22
    
That is correct. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 11 '13 at 11:43

While it is true that Tkinter uses old-style classes, this limitation can be overcome by additionally deriving the subclass Application from object (using Python multiple inheritance):

import Tkinter as tk

class Application(tk.Frame, object):

    def __init__(self, master):
        super(Application, self).__init__(master)
        self.grid()

def main():
    root = tk.Tk()
    root.geometry('200x150')
    app = Application(root)

    root.mainloop()

main()

This will work so long as the Tkinter class doesn't attempt any behaviour which requires being an old-style class to work (which I highly doubt it would). I tested the example above with Python 2.7.7 without any issues.

This work around was suggested here. This behaviour is also included by default in Python 3 (referenced in link).

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The indentation of your answer looks incorrect. –  Bryan Oakley Oct 15 '14 at 1:40
    
Thanks, I don't know how I missed that. Pretty poor form. –  teletypist Oct 25 '14 at 3:39

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