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In Java, it's common to write the following (e.g. for event handling) in order to make use of the template method pattern:

abstract class SomeAbstractClass {
    public abstract void SomeFunction ();
}

//...

SomeAbstractClass obj = new SomeAbstractClass () {
    public void SomeFunction () { /* implementation */ }
};

In C++, the following compiles:

class SomeAbstractClass {
    virtual void SomeFunction () = 0;
};

// ...

SomeAbstractClass * obj = new ( class : public SomeAbstractClass {
    virtual void SomeFunction () { /* implementation */ }
});

Why don't people do this usually?

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What compiler accepts that? –  Mat Aug 11 '13 at 12:01
1  
Java's need to resort to them is bad enough. As for C++, using new is a big mistake. As well, no one does this because apart from the illegality, C++ offers far superior ways of passing functions to other functions. –  chris Aug 11 '13 at 12:01
1  
@Mat : g++ --pedantic --std=c++0x, version 4.6.3 –  JohnB Aug 11 '13 at 12:02
3  
Fails with 4.7 and up, and clang++. "error: types may not be defined in a new-expression" –  Mat Aug 11 '13 at 12:03
3  
Seems to be this: gcc.gnu.org/ml/gcc-patches/2012-01/msg00345.html –  JohnB Aug 11 '13 at 12:05

1 Answer 1

Three problems i think occurs with anonymous class

  • You cannot write a constructor as class doesn't have a name.
  • initializer list inheritance is not allowed.
  • capturing value is also difficult, final variable are accessible only.
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