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I'm working on a Project Euler problem: the one about the sum of the even Fibonacci numbers.

My code:

def Fibonacci(n):
    if n == 0:
        return 0
    elif n == 1:
        return 1
    else:
        return Fibonacci(n-1) + Fibonacci(n-2)

list1 = [x for x in range(39)]
list2 = [i for i in list1 if Fibonacci(i) % 2 == 0]

The problem's solution can be easily found by printing sum(list2). However, it is taking a lot of time to come up with the list2 I'm guessing. Is there any way to make this faster? Or is it okay even this way...

(the problem: By considering the terms in the Fibonacci sequence whose values do not exceed four million, find the sum of the even-valued terms.)

share|improve this question
    
P.S. I found the values for which it does not exceed 4 million by trying. –  user65165 Aug 11 '13 at 13:12
    
Hint: try reading the wiki page... –  Mitch Wheat Aug 11 '13 at 13:12
    
No: the wiki page for Fibonacci numbers.... –  Mitch Wheat Aug 11 '13 at 13:15
    
Naive recursion only runs in O(phi^n) –  recursion.ninja Sep 24 '14 at 2:09
    
You could compute it in O(log n). See nth fibonacci number in sublinear time. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 19 '14 at 19:12

13 Answers 13

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Yes. The primitive recursive solution takes a lot of time. The reason for this is that for each number calculated, it needs to calculate all the previous numbers more than once. Take a look at the following image.

Tree representing fibonacci calculation

It represents calculating Fibonacci(5) with your function. As you can see, it computes the value of Fibonacci(2) three times, and the value of Fibonacci(1) five times. That just gets worse and worse the higher the number you want to compute.

What makes it even worse is that with each fibonacci number you calculate in your list, you don't use the previous numbers you have knowledge of to speed up the computation – you compute each number "from scratch."

There are a few options to make this faster:


1. Create a list "from the bottom up"

The easiest way is to just create a list of fibonacci numbers up to the number you want. If you do that, you build "from the bottom up" or so to speak, and you can reuse previous numbers to create the next one. If you have a list of the fibonacci numbers [0, 1, 1, 2, 3], you can use the last two numbers in that list to create the next number.

This approach would look something like this:

>>> def fib_to(n):
...     fibs = [0, 1]
...     for i in range(2, n+1):
...         fibs.append(fibs[-1] + fibs[-2])
...     return fibs
...

Then you can get the first 20 fibonacci numbers by doing

>>> fib_to(20)
[0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610, 987, 1597, 2584, 4181, 6765]

Or you can get the 17th fibonacci number from a list of the first 40 by doing

>>> fib_to(40)[17]
1597

2. Memoization (relatively advanced technique)

Another alternative to make it faster exists, but it is a little more complicated as well. Since your problem is that you re-compute values you have already computed, you can instead choose to save the values you have already computed in a dict, and try to get them from that before you recompute them. This is called memoization. It may look something like this:

>>> def fib(n, computed = {0: 0, 1: 1}):
...     if n not in computed:
...         computed[n] = fib(n-1, computed) + fib(n-2, computed)
...     return computed[n]

This allows you to compute big fibonacci numbers in a breeze:

>>> fib(400)
176023680645013966468226945392411250770384383304492191886725992896575345044216019675

This is in fact such a common technique that Python 3 includes a decorator to do this for you. I present to you, automatic memoization!

import functools

@functools.lru_cache(None)
def fib(n):
    if n < 2:
        return n
    return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2)

This does pretty much the same thing as the previous function, but with all the computed stuff handled by the lru_cache decorator.


3. Just count up (a naïve iterative solution)

A third method, as suggested by Mitch, is to just count up without saving the intermediary values in a list. You could imagine doing

>>> def fib(n):
...     a, b = 0, 1
...     for _ in range(n):
...         a, b = b, a+b
...     return a

I don't recommend these last two methods if your goal is to create a list of fibonacci numbers. fib_to(100) is going to be a lot faster than [fib(n) for n in range(101)] because with the latter, you still get the problem of computing each number in the list from scratch.

share|improve this answer
2  
or you could use the iterative formula ... –  Mitch Wheat Aug 11 '13 at 13:42
    
If you change the function at the end coming from mitch to a generator instead, it'll be even better, as you won't be recalculating the numbers each time. just change return to yield and move it into the for loop. –  will Aug 11 '13 at 14:06
    
@will wouldn't it basically become the first function by then? (Except that you can only take a value once out of it, and you can't index it.) –  kqr Aug 11 '13 at 14:21
    
Awesome reply! Thank you very much. I learned a lot of new stuff as well :D –  user65165 Aug 11 '13 at 14:29
    
@kqr yah. It would be the same, but without requiring they all be stored. If you wanted to index it, then you'd just need to do list(fib(N)). Probably at a small performance hit though. I didn't read the whole answer. I'm hungover. –  will Aug 11 '13 at 14:56

This is a very fast algorithm and it can find n-th Fibonacci number much faster than simple iterative approach presented in other answers, it is quite advanced though:

def fib(n):
    v1, v2, v3 = 1, 1, 0    # initialise a matrix [[1,1],[1,0]]
    for rec in bin(n)[3:]:  # perform fast exponentiation of the matrix (quickly raise it to the nth power)
        calc = v2*v2
        v1, v2, v3 = v1*v1+calc, (v1+v3)*v2, calc+v3*v3
        if rec=='1':    v1, v2, v3 = v1+v2, v1, v2
    return v2

You can read some more about involved math here.


share|improve this answer
    
Where can I find a mathematical explanation source for first method? –  m_poorUser Sep 28 '14 at 12:39
    
You can read about involved math here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number#Matrix_form. My algorithm uses fast exponentiation to raise the matrix to the nth power. –  Piotr Dabkowski Sep 28 '14 at 13:02
    
It's too cryptic to understand. I don't recommend the solution for fresh-starters. –  Ali Arda Orhan Apr 21 at 10:56

Any problems like this will take a long time to run if there are a lot of levels of recursion. The recursive definition is good for coding the problem in a way that can be easily understood, but if you need it to run faster an iterative solution such as the answer in this thread will be much quicker.

share|improve this answer
    
which is why I suggested the poster look at the wiki page for Fibonacci numbers –  Mitch Wheat Aug 11 '13 at 13:25
    
Recursively expressing something does not make it automatically easier to understand –  Esailija Aug 11 '13 at 13:25
    
@Esailija I agree that it doesn't automatically make it easier to understand, but you can often express it more succinctly and in a very similar way to a the way you would see the formula shown e.g. fibonacci formula is F_n = F_{n-1} + F_{n-2} with seed values F_0 = 0, F_1 = 1. The program suggested by the OP is almost identical. –  ChrisProsser Aug 11 '13 at 13:36
    
@MitchWheat It may be helpful if you provide link. I tried searching and found this page: stackoverflow.com/tags/fibonacci/info which doesn't seem to say anything not covered by the OP. –  ChrisProsser Aug 11 '13 at 13:47
    
@ChrisProsser: I'm assuming even a new user can use a search engine. –  Mitch Wheat Aug 11 '13 at 13:48

Recursively calculating Fibonacci will be most inefficient than doing iteratively. My recommendation is:

Take the time to create a Fibonacci class as an iterator, and do the calculations independently for each element in the index, maybe with some @memoize decorator (and also here) to cache all previous calculations.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
In case you are referring to tail-call optimisation when you say "optimize right recursive code" – that's not a possible optimisation to do here, since you recurse down two branches. If it would be possible at all, you would be able to emulate it in Python using a keyword argument. –  kqr Aug 11 '13 at 13:36
    
@kqr: I see, so this kind of optimization can't be done in functional languages? –  Paulo Bu Aug 11 '13 at 13:38
    
Not when computing fibonacci numbers using this method, no. The computer needs to keep each frame in the stack to be able to perform the addition. –  kqr Aug 11 '13 at 13:45
    
@kqr: Thanks, I'll remove that recommendation from the answer to prevent further misleading. –  Paulo Bu Aug 11 '13 at 14:40

kqr's solution nr 2 is my definite favourite.
However in this specific case we are loosing all our calculations between consequent calls within the list comprehension:

list2 = [i for i in list1 if fib(i) % 2 == 0]

, so I decided to go one step further and memoize it between loop steps as follows:

def cache_fib(ff):
    comp = {0: 0, 1: 1}

    def fib_cached(n, computed=comp):
        return ff(n, computed)
    return fib_cached


@cache_fib
def fib(n, computed={0: 0, 1: 1}):
    if n not in computed:
        computed[n] = fib(n - 1, computed) + fib(n - 2, computed)
    return computed[n]
share|improve this answer

Haskell 1 liner :-

fibs = 0 : (f 1 1) where f a b = a : f b (a+b)

This code is extremely efficient and calculates Fibonacci numbers up to (10^1000) in less than a second ! This code will also be useful for this problem in Project Euler.

share|improve this answer

Python doesn't optimize tail recursion, thus most solutions presented here will fail with Error: maximum recursion depth exceeded in comparison if n is too big (and by big, I mean 1000).

The recursion limit can be increased, but it will make Python crash on stack overflow in the operating system.

Note the difference in performance between fib_memo / fib_local and fib_lru / fib_local_exc: LRU cache is a lot slower and didn't even complete, because it produces a runtime error already for n = ~500:

import functools
from time import clock
#import sys
#sys.setrecursionlimit()

@functools.lru_cache(None)
def fib_lru(n):
    if n < 2:
        return n
    return fib_lru(n-1) + fib_lru(n-2)

def fib_memo(n, computed = {0: 0, 1: 1}):
    if n not in computed:
        computed[n] = fib_memo(n-1, computed) + fib_memo(n-2, computed)
    return computed[n]

def fib_local(n):
    computed = {0: 0, 1: 1}
    def fib_inner(n):
        if n not in computed:
            computed[n] = fib_inner(n-1) + fib_inner(n-2)
        return computed[n]
    return fib_inner(n)

def fib_local_exc(n):
    computed = {0: 0, 1: 1}
    def fib_inner_x(n):
        try:
            computed[n]
        except KeyError:
            computed[n] = fib_inner_x(n-1) + fib_inner_x(n-2)
        return computed[n]

    return fib_inner_x(n)

def fib_iter(n):
    a, b = 0, 1
    for i in range(n):
        a, b = b, a + b
    return a

def benchmark(n, *args):
    print("-" * 80)
    for func in args:
        print(func.__name__)
        start = clock()
        try:
            ret = func(n)
            #print("Result:", ret)
        except RuntimeError as e:
            print("Error:", e)
        print("Time:", "{:.8f}".format(clock() - start))
        print()

benchmark(500, fib_iter, fib_memo, fib_local, fib_local_exc, fib_lru)

Results:

fib_iter
Time: 0.00008168

fib_memo
Time: 0.00048622

fib_local
Time: 0.00044645

fib_local_exc
Time: 0.00146036

fib_lru
Error: maximum recursion depth exceeded in comparison
Time: 0.00112552

The iterative solution is by far the fastest and does not corrupt the stack even for n=100k (0.162 seconds). It does not return the intermediate Fibonacci numbers indeed.

If you want to compute the nth even Fibonacci number, you could adapt the iterative approach like this:

def fib_even_iter(n):
    a, b = 0, 1
    c = 1
    while c < n:
        a, b = b, a + b
        if a % 2 == 0:
            c += 1
    return a

Or if you are interested in every even number on the way, use a generator:

def fib_even_gen(n):
    a, b = 0, 1
    c = 1
    yield a
    while c < n:
        a, b = b, a + b
        if a % 2 == 0:
            yield a
            c += 1
    return a

for i, f in enumerate(fib_even_gen(100), 1):
    print("{:3d}.  {:d}".format(i, f))

Result:

  1.  0
  2.  2
  3.  8
  4.  34
  5.  144
  6.  610
  7.  2584
  8.  10946
  9.  46368
 10.  196418
 11.  832040
 12.  3524578
 13.  14930352
 14.  63245986
 15.  267914296
 16.  1134903170
 17.  4807526976
 18.  20365011074
 19.  86267571272
 20.  365435296162
 21.  1548008755920
 22.  6557470319842
 23.  27777890035288
 24.  117669030460994
 25.  498454011879264
 26.  2111485077978050
 27.  8944394323791464
 28.  37889062373143906
 29.  160500643816367088
 30.  679891637638612258
 31.  2880067194370816120
 32.  12200160415121876738
 33.  51680708854858323072
 34.  218922995834555169026
 35.  927372692193078999176
 36.  3928413764606871165730
 37.  16641027750620563662096
 38.  70492524767089125814114
 39.  298611126818977066918552
 40.  1264937032042997393488322
 41.  5358359254990966640871840
 42.  22698374052006863956975682
 43.  96151855463018422468774568
 44.  407305795904080553832073954
 45.  1725375039079340637797070384
 46.  7308805952221443105020355490
 47.  30960598847965113057878492344
 48.  131151201344081895336534324866
 49.  555565404224292694404015791808
 50.  2353412818241252672952597492098
 51.  9969216677189303386214405760200
 52.  42230279526998466217810220532898
 53.  178890334785183168257455287891792
 54.  757791618667731139247631372100066
 55.  3210056809456107725247980776292056
 56.  13598018856492162040239554477268290
 57.  57602132235424755886206198685365216
 58.  244006547798191185585064349218729154
 59.  1033628323428189498226463595560281832
 60.  4378519841510949178490918731459856482
 61.  18547707689471986212190138521399707760
 62.  78569350599398894027251472817058687522
 63.  332825110087067562321196029789634457848
 64.  1409869790947669143312035591975596518914
 65.  5972304273877744135569338397692020533504
 66.  25299086886458645685589389182743678652930
 67.  107168651819712326877926895128666735145224
 68.  453973694165307953197296969697410619233826
 69.  1923063428480944139667114773918309212080528
 70.  8146227408089084511865756065370647467555938
 71.  34507973060837282187130139035400899082304280
 72.  146178119651438213260386312206974243796773058
 73.  619220451666590135228675387863297874269396512
 74.  2623059926317798754175087863660165740874359106
 75.  11111460156937785151929026842503960837766832936
 76.  47068900554068939361891195233676009091941690850
 77.  199387062373213542599493807777207997205533596336
 78.  844617150046923109759866426342507997914076076194
 79.  3577855662560905981638959513147239988861837901112
 80.  15156039800290547036315704478931467953361427680642
 81.  64202014863723094126901777428873111802307548623680
 82.  271964099255182923543922814194423915162591622175362
 83.  1152058411884454788302593034206568772452674037325128
 84.  4880197746793002076754294951020699004973287771475874
 85.  20672849399056463095319772838289364792345825123228624
 86.  87571595343018854458033386304178158174356588264390370
 87.  370959230771131880927453318055001997489772178180790104
 88.  1571408518427546378167846658524186148133445300987550786
 89.  6656593304481317393598839952151746590023553382130993248
 90.  28197781736352815952563206467131172508227658829511523778
 91.  119447720249892581203851665820676436622934188700177088360
 92.  505988662735923140767969869749836918999964413630219877218
 93.  2143402371193585144275731144820024112622791843221056597232
 94.  9079598147510263717870894449029933369491131786514446266146
 95.  38461794961234640015759308940939757590587318989278841661816
 96.  162926777992448823780908130212788963731840407743629812913410
 97.  690168906931029935139391829792095612517948949963798093315456
 98.  2923602405716568564338475449381171413803636207598822186175234
 99.  12384578529797304192493293627316781267732493780359086838016392
100.  52461916524905785334311649958648296484733611329035169538240802

Time: 0.00698620

That's the first 100 even Fibonacci numbers in ~7ms and includes the overhead of printing to terminal (easy to underestimate on Windows).

share|improve this answer

Solution in R, benchmark calculates 1 to 1000th Fibonacci number series in 1.9 seconds. Would be much faster in C++ or Fortran, in fact, since writing the initial post, I wrote an equivalent function in C++ which completed in an impressive 0.0033 seconds, even python completed in 0.3 seconds.

#Calculate Fibonnaci Sequence
fib <- function(n){
  if(n <= 2)
    return(as.integer(as.logical(n)))
  k = as.integer(n/2)
  a = fib(k + 1)
  b = fib(k)
  if(n %% 2 == 1)
    return(a*a + b*b)
  return(b*(2*a - b))
}

#Function to do every fibonacci number up to nmax
doFib <- function(nmax = 25,doPrint=FALSE){
  nmax = abs(nmax)
  res = c()
  for(i in 0:nmax){
    res = c(res,fib(i))
  }
  if(doPrint)
    print(paste(res,collapse=","))
  return(res)
}

#Benchmark
system.time(doFib(1000))

#user  system elapsed 
#  1.874   0.007   1.892 
share|improve this answer

I like to use like this, to find the nth Fibonacci number, in Python:

def fib(n):
    a, b = 0, 1
    while n:
        a, b, n = b, a+b, n-1
    return a
share|improve this answer

One fast way is to calculate the fib(n/2) number recursively:

fibs = {0: 0, 1: 1}
def fib(n):
    if n in fibs: return fibs[n]
    if n % 2 == 0:
        fibs[n] = ((2 * fib((n / 2) - 1)) + fib(n / 2)) * fib(n / 2)
        return fibs[n]
    else:
        fibs[n] = (fib((n - 1) / 2) ** 2) + (fib((n+1) / 2) ** 2)
        return fibs[n]

from time import time
s=time()
print fib(1000000)
print time()-s
share|improve this answer

To find the sum of the first n even-valued fibonacci numbers directly, put 3n + 2 in your favourite method to efficiently compute a single fibonacci number, decrement by one and divide by two (fib((3*n+2) - 1)/2)). How did math dummies survive before OEIS?

share|improve this answer

Although a late answer but it might be helpful

fib_dict = {}

def fib(n): 
    try:
        return fib_dict[n]
    except:
        if n<=1:
            fib_dict[n] = n
            return n
        else:
            fib_dict[n] = fib(n-1) + fib (n-2)
            return fib(n-1) + fib (n-2)

print fib(100)

This is much faster than the traditional way

share|improve this answer
    
Answering what? Try to understand the question, check whether the answer you're tempted to give is already there - or in one of the "duplicate"s. –  greybeard 2 days ago
    
@greybeard Its just an additional info that wont harm anyone.It might not help you but it would certainly help others who seek it. –  Abx yesterday
int count=0;
void fibbo(int,int);

void main()

{

fibbo(0,1);

    getch();
}

void fibbo(int a,int b)

{

 count++;

 printf(" %d ",a);

if(count<=10)

     fibbo(b,a+b);

else

      return;

}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you write a small explanation on what your code is doing? –  Bonifacio2 Apr 9 '14 at 13:33

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