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What is the difference between Catch(Exception) and Catch(Exception ex) . I can see both giving me expected output. Then what is the actual difference ? Which one is recommended ?

Suppose the code is below.

int a = 1, b = 0;
try
{
    int c = a / b;
    Console.WriteLine(c);
}

Which of the below catch block is recommended to use ? What is the actual difference between those ?

catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
}

OR

catch (Exception)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Oh NO!!");
}
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If you are not interested in what exception are you catching (info on stack, message etc) you could simply write catch {Console.WriteLine("Oh No");} –  Steve Aug 11 '13 at 15:04
1  
The difference is that you'll have some idea why your program stops working correctly in the 1st snippet. None whatsoever in the 2nd snippet. The 2nd way is what makes SO users ask questions like "it doesn't work, there was an error". Just don't write code like this at all. –  Hans Passant Aug 11 '13 at 15:14
    
@Steve There is a tiny difference between catch and catch (Exception). The first will catch all exception objects, the second will only catch exceptions objects deriving from Exception. In C# you can only throw objects deriving from Exception, but the CLR supports more. –  user1908061 Aug 11 '13 at 16:39
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, catch(Exception ex) is just the same as catch(Exception) with one difference only: in catch(Exception ex) we have an access to the exception class (error cause) instance. Usually you need an exception class instance to print out the original message:

  try {
    ...
  }
  catch (AppServerException e) {
    Console.WriteLine("Application server failed to get data with the message:");
    Console.WriteLine(e.Message); // <- What's actually got wrong with it
  }

If you don't need the exception class instance, e.g. you plan just to consume the exception, the catch(Exception ex) syntax is excessive and catch(Exception) is prefferable:

  try {  
    c = a / b;
  }  
  catch (DivideByZeroException) {
    c = Int.MaxValue; // <- in case b = 0, let c be the maximum possible int
  }

Finally. Do not catch general Exception class without re-throughing:

  try {
    int c = a / b;
  }
  catch (Exception) { // <- Never ever do this!
    Console.WriteLine("Oh NO!!");
  }

do you really want to code "whatever error (green fume from CPU included) had happend just print out "Oh No" and continue"? The pattern with Exception class is something like this:

  tran.Start();

  try {
    ...
    tran.Commit();
  }
  catch (Exception) {
    // Whatever had happened, let's first rollback the database transaction
    tran.Rollback();

    Console.WriteLine("Oh NO!");

    throw; // <- re-throw the exception
  }
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I disagree with 'Do not catch general Exception class without re-throwing'. and _'Do you really want to code "whatever error" just print out "Oh No" and continue?'. 1. Sometimes I do 2. There are other things I may want to do (besides logging). It is common to catch Exception ex in code. –  Tymek Aug 12 '13 at 0:20
    
It's DivideByZeroException not ZeroDivisonException afaik. –  Tymek Aug 12 '13 at 0:20
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It's quite simple:

  • in the first code, you can catch the exception and get the object representing it so you can have more information about what happened
  • in the second code, you only know that an exception has been raised, but you don't have more information about it.

What to use actually depends on how much information you want to have about the exception raised.

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If you need to use the exception inside the catch block, give Exception a name; otherwise, keep it anonymous.

There are situations when the catch block needs to do more than simply show exception's message. For example, when you catch application-specific exceptions, you may be able to examine additional elements of the exception object. Here is a hypothetical example:

catch (ConnectToServerException cse) {
    MessageBox.Show(string.Format(
        "Connection to server '{0}' failed. Use a name from the following list: {1}"
    ,   cse.AttemptedConnectionServerName
    ,   string.Join(", ", cse.AllowedServerNames)
    ));
}

The above code assumes that the custom exception ConnectToServerException has a property called AttemptedConnectionServerName with the name of the server to which you tried to connect, and an enumeration property AllowedServerNames with the names of available servers.

There are also situations when all you need to know is that an exception of a particular type just happened. In this case, you do not need to provide a named variable for it.

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The difference is that one will print Attempted to divide by zero. and the other will print Oh NO!!.

Handling exceptions is a complex problem and depends on the application, but here are few general comments:


Generally speaking it's best to provide handlers for specific exceptions:

Something like:

 catch ({System.DivideByZeroException ex )
 {
    Console.WriteLine("Ops. I cannot divide by zero." );
 }
 catch ({System.Exception ex )
 {
    Console.WriteLine("There was an error during calculations: {0}", ex.Message );
 }

Sooner or later you will find out that Console.WriteLine is just not good enough and you will have to use a logger so best to start using it early.


Ideally, if you decide to expose raw error messages to the user, you should be printing all messages in the exception chain or at least the one which is most deep.

Something like:

 catch ({System.DivideByZeroException ex )
 {
    Console.WriteLine("Oops. I cannot divide by zero." );
 }
 catch ({System.Exception ex )
 {
    Console.WriteLine(GetExceptionMsgs(ex));
 }

 ...in another class...
public static string GetExceptionMsgs(Exception ex) {
   if( ex == null ) {
       return "No exception = no details";
   }
   var sb = new StringBuilder();
   while( ex != null ) {
        sb.AppendLine(ex.Message);
        ex = ex.InnerException;
   }
   return sb.ToString()
}
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With catch(Exception) you only specify what kind of exception you're gonna handle in that catch block (in this case, any exception that is raised, so it would be the same as just catch)

With catch(Exception ex) you pass an instance of the actual exception that is raised, so you can access the properties of the exception and do something with the information provided.

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Catch (Exception) do the same thing, as it is also a Exception type.

Catch (Exception ex) catches all exceptions and in addition you can retrieve message through its reference.

Use is dependent on requirement, if you want to show exception message you have facility to use ex.Message otherwise Catch (Exception) will be enough.

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