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To get the odd numbers from the array i got this code but didn't understand one syntax. Code is as below

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

# initialize an array
my @array = qw(3 4 5 6 7 8 9);

my @subArray = ();
  foreach (@array) {
  push @subArray, $_ if $_ & 1;
}
print "@subArray\n";
# displays: 3 5 7 9

What is "if $_ & 1" This is working. But i didn't get the syntax "if $_ & 1".

Similarly grep can be used like "my @subArray = grep $_ & 1, @array; "

Please help me understanding the syntax

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@Sean: Thanks for the reply. But it is still unclear to me. I went to the link but didn't get. It would be appreciable if you explain it –  Nitesh Aug 11 '13 at 17:49
    
Make sure to accept an answer if one worked for you. –  hwnd Aug 13 '13 at 20:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The logic:
If you do an AND operation between an odd number and 1 (in binary, of course), the result obtained will always be 1.

How it works:
The above code looks for an odd number by performing a bitwise AND operation between the array element and the number 1. If the operation results in "true", it is inserted into the final array (@subArray). The $_ here is referring to the individual element of the original array which is accessed during iteration.

Here's how the bitwise AND operation works.

  1. Suppose you want to determine if 3 is an odd number (binary for 3 -> 0011).
  2. As per this code, you are performing a bitwise AND with 1, the binary for which, is 0001.
  3. the AND operation takes place between 0011 and 0001, and since it is bitwise, each bit is AND'ed with the corresponding bit of the other.
  4. Here's how it happens,
    Binary for 3 : 0 0 1 1
    Binary for 1 : 0 0 0 1
    Result of AND : 0 0 0 1
  5. As you can see, the final result is 1, which is also the lowest order bit (first bit starting from right). Hence the expression if $_ & 1; results in "true" and the number is inserted into the subArray, via the push operation.
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The structure of that line is:

<statement> if <condition>

where <statement> is push @subArray, $_ and <condition> is $_ & 1.

The expression $_ & 1 is 1 or 0 according to whether the lowest-order bit of $_ is set or not. If it is 1 (which is a true value in Perl), then push @subArray, $_ is executed; otherwise it is 0 (a false value in Perl) and the statement is skipped.

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"the lowest-order bit of $_" --> what is lowest order bit –  Nitesh Aug 11 '13 at 17:50
    
How it is working to find odd numbers from the array . Rest all syntax including "push" is clear –  Nitesh Aug 11 '13 at 17:51
1  
@Nitesh - That would be the bit corresponding to 2^0 in the binary expansion of $_. That bit being set is equivalent to $_ having an odd value. This is a nearly-universal test for whether a value is even or odd. –  Ted Hopp Aug 11 '13 at 17:51
    
Got it. Thanks :) –  Nitesh Aug 11 '13 at 17:53

What is $_ & 1?

This expression segregates the low-bit, and only the numbers with low-bit set (odd numbers)

  • $_ is the default variable, in this case each array element
  • & is binary AND operator/bitwise string operator (returns its operands together bit by bit)
  • 1 is just one

  • See perldoc perlop (Multiplicative Operators) and bit-hacks for further explanation.

Alternatively, you can parse your even/odd using the modulo operator %.

Using a for loop.

my @odd;
for (@array) {
   push @odd, $_ if $_ % 2;
}

Using map

my @odd = map { $_ % 2 ? $_ : () } @array;

Or even an array slice using grep..

my @odd = @array[grep { ! ($_ % 2) } 0 .. $#array];
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The meaning of $_ & 1 has already explained above, but in this case, I believe it would be more maintainable if you write like:

my @oddArray = grep { $_ % 2 != 0 } @array;

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Why != 0? I don't get it. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Aug 12 '13 at 5:42
    
@Hynek-Pichi-Vychodil I know it's a kind of redundant, but I just want to indicate explicitly that we only collect odd numbers with grep in this example, although without the != 0 it still does the same thing. –  Alec Aug 12 '13 at 6:35
1  
Truth and Falsehood says that The number 0, the strings '0' and "" , the empty list () , and undef are all false in a boolean context. All other values are true. $_ % 2 evaluates only into 0 or 1 so adding != 0 is just waste in many ways including reader's brain capacity. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Aug 12 '13 at 7:19

Why not simply?

my @subArray = grep {$_ & 1} @array;

And why you initialize array using qw(3 4 5 6 7 8 9) when you need numbers?

my @array = (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9);

is much better. You are just wasting CPU time and memory and more importantly misleading reader of your code. Which points me out to more obvious code.

my @subArray = grep {$_ % 2} @array;

The performance difference will be negligible and it is far more obvious what is going on.

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