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I have this code

for (k=0; k<BUFFER_LEN; k++){                

           buffer[k] = sin(2*pi*f/fs*k);          //sine generation

my loop increments by 1 each time - so k will be 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.... etc for each calculation

I would like the loop to increment by 0.1 each time for example, so my sine calculation is more accurate? What would be the simplest way to achieve this? I tried incrementing by 0.1 in that for loop but dont think this is allowed as the program times out

edit: here is a solution

int i, k;
float z=0.1;

for(i = 0; i < BUFFER_LEN; i++){                         // fill the buffer
       buffer[k] = sin(2*pi*f/fs*z);                     // sine wave value generation
       z = z + 0.1;
       }
share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by devnull, Joshua Taylor, Ryan Bigg, torazaburo, Antti Haapala Aug 12 '13 at 4:01

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  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – devnull, Joshua Taylor, Ryan Bigg, torazaburo, Antti Haapala
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2  
Are you incrementing an int by .1 adding .1 will just get you back the same number due to truncation? It would be more helpful if you provided a SSCCE. – Shafik Yaghmour Aug 11 '13 at 18:55
    
this question needs a bit more information about what you'd like to have in buffer at then end of the loop. – Rob Starling Aug 11 '13 at 21:21
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Simple Solution: Multiple by your desired gain

double gain = 0.1;
for (k=0; k<BUFFER_LEN; k++) {                
  buffer[k] = sin(gain * 2*pi*(f/fs)*k);          //sine generation
}

No need to change your k loop, BUFFER_LEN & no floating point issues. 1/Gain does not need to be an integer.


Your original problem was likely due to:

int k;
for (k=0; k<BUFFER_LEN; k += 0.1) {                
  buffer[k] = sin(2*pi*f/fs*k);          //sine generation
}

In this case, the k += 0.1 did k = (int) (k + 0.1) which truncates the sum back to the original k. Thus your loop runs forever.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep! so simple i should have thought of that myself - yes your right, if i tried to increment with a non-integer the loop just ran forever - many thanks!! – user2459764 Aug 11 '13 at 21:19

If all you want to do is increment by .1, your k value needs to be a float. After that, it's as simple as this:

for(double k = 0; k < limit; k += 0.1)

But the over usage of decimal values could cause rounding errors, and your code needs k to be a whole number. Here is perhaps a better solution:

for(int k = 0; k < limit * 10; k++){
    //Now, in your equation, use k/10.0
    buffer[k] = sin(2 * pi * f / fs * (k / 10.0));
}

Make sure the size of buffer is ten times what it would need to be!

share|improve this answer
    
you should probably remove the double option, as the buffer array cannot be indexed by it – Rob Starling Aug 11 '13 at 21:20

A naive solution would be:

for (double k=0; k<BUFFER_LEN/10; k+=0.1){                

           buffer[10*k] = sin(2*pi*f/fs*k);

But rounding errors could lead to a wrong result. That's why you should use integer arithmetic in the loop and multiply in the loop by 0.1.

I'll leave this as a reminder what not to do.

share|improve this answer
2  
If k equals e.g. 1.1, what does buffer[1.1] mean? – Qiu Aug 11 '13 at 18:57
    
@Qiu: true, corrected. – Burkhard Aug 11 '13 at 18:58
    
Should BUFFER_LEN be an integer (a likely occurrence), BUFFER_LEN/10 will perform integer division. Example for (float k=0; k<4/10; k+=0.1) will iterate 0 times rather than expected 4. – chux Aug 11 '13 at 19:41
    
Due to rounding errors, using floating point in a loop iteration, as this code does, may overrun the desired endpoint and will have increasing rounding errors during the loop. Iteration counting should be done with integer arithmetic. – Eric Postpischil Aug 11 '13 at 19:43
    
@EricPostpischil: thanks. Very true. Did not think of that. – Burkhard Aug 12 '13 at 6:03

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