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I am trying to implement a column-oriented data storage engine in java. I wanted to know if there is any other way to for implementing consecutive memory allocation for dynamically growing arrays.

HashMaps cannot allocate consecutive memory blocks upon expansion/resizing.


Even by creating new fixed array of greater size and copying values from old fixed array to this new array looks like the only option to achieve consecutiveness, but this is very slow when compared to for ex. say you have 1 million records already in the column (fixed array) of size current size 1 million and you need to insert new value at the 1000001 position then the jvm has to create new array of size 1000001 and copy all the values to the new array of larger size (just to insert one value) and maintain consecutiveness.


ArrayList work much as the same way internally (allocating new array + copying old values and so on) as described above. So as vectors with additional overhead of synchronization for thread safety.


So another way of allocation of large consecutive memory by creating a huge fixed array during initialization results into lot of unused memory and is not a viable solution.


Please help if any better option is available. For ex. something like (if it is possible to achieve in Java) knowing the address of last element in current fixed array and somehow checking that next consecutive available block if it is available for use ? If so then using it to store new value as well as updating array index to accomodate this new change to maintain O(1) time read access?


Thanks.

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Well, those are basically your choices: Allocate a lot to start with and know you won't have to copy but are "wasting" memory in the meantime, or allocate smaller blocks and copy as necessary. A linked list of reasonably-sized blocks is one "middle ground." –  T.J. Crowder Aug 11 '13 at 21:38
    
Why does consecutive memory matter to you? Also, ArrayList is backed by an array and hence consecutive memory. Of course, you can do the same thing by hand as ArrayList (and avoid some boxing in the process), it's really not that hard. –  delnan Aug 11 '13 at 21:48
    
I just checked jdk internal implementation of ArrayList and came to know that internal it is initialized with default size of 10 and then does the same process of creating new array+1 size then-> copying old values to this new one when it requires an expansion on add() method. So I think they are allocated with consecutive memory blocks (backed by array index) but has performance hit during re-sizing of huge arraylist. –  Dhwanit Aug 11 '13 at 22:22
    
So is there any other soln ? for ex. knowing the address of last element in current fixed array and somehow checking that next consecutive available block if it is available for use ? If so then using it to store new value as well as updating array index to accomodate this new change to maintain O(1) time read access? –  Dhwanit Aug 11 '13 at 22:24
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Have you actually done benchmarking? I'd strongly suggest that you're overestimating the "performance hit" from resizing large ArrayLists. (For starters, add is amortized O(1) even accounting for the resizing.) –  Louis Wasserman Aug 12 '13 at 3:14

2 Answers 2

If you're trying to do this "by hand", a common technique is to double the size of the array every time you need to increase it. So in your example, you could resize your array to 2 million; this is expensive, but it means you won't need to resize again for a long time.

This gives you array inserts in amortized constant time, although it might be undesirable to occasionally have an expensive operation like copying 1 million rows, so you might have to modify this idea to accommodate your specific needs. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_array for more discussion of dynamic array implementations.

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This is a good way to allocate more memory on every re-size but then there is a lot of unused space created which jvm cannot use for other purposes. Increasing size like 2^x , x=1 to n, will be a good way. Still wanted more convincing solution or data structure with O(1) read access time like in array. –  Dhwanit Aug 11 '13 at 22:37

There are a lot of hacks, but Java's ArrayList is one of the most efficient existing combinations of an array that can grow.

You could create arrays with a fixed length and then connect those in a list (thus growing only needs to attach an additional array and doesn't need to copy it). However, if your data structure is expected to grow a lot, it is probably better to implement it as a list entirely.

You could extend this by doubling the size of the array that is concatenated. Thus you create a list of arrays with respective sized of 50, 100, 200, 400 and so on. You can calculate the array (and position) as follows:

int x = 55; // position

int position = (int)Math.floor(Math.log(1 + x / 50) / Math.log(2));
int arrayposition = x - (Math.pow(2, position) * 50);

Even for large data values, this would still be a pretty fast data structure (O(n) is worst-case value for data retrieval and extending it is O(1))

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Your solution of having multiple arrays of fixed sizes and connecting them in a list looks better then pure ArrayList but still consecutive allocation is not guaranteed which I create another fixed array to attach to previous existing list of arrays. Is it possible to gain complete consicutiveness ? –  Dhwanit Aug 11 '13 at 21:45
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if you want complete consecutiveness, you will have to allocate it. If the memory is not allocated, the system can use it for other purposes. If you need the space, then you have to indicate it, so it will be reserved. If you need to extend and cannot accurately predict the size, you need to use lists (that use different blocks in the memory) –  bas Aug 11 '13 at 21:57
    
I just checked jdk internal implementation of ArrayList and came to know that internal it is initialized with default size of 10 and then does the same process of creating new array+1 size->copying old values etc. when it requires an expansion on add() method. So I think they are within consecutive memory blocks but has performance hit during re-sizing. –  Dhwanit Aug 11 '13 at 22:18
    
This algorithm does not have the performance hit during resizing, but it doesn't have a guaranteed O(1) performance when retrieving a value. –  bas Aug 11 '13 at 22:19
    
Are you sure O(1) is not guaranteed ? Can I have pointers to the documentation where it's mentioned so, if possible to share? Also I was looking for something like for ex. knowing the address of last element in current fixed array and somehow checking that next consecutive available block if it is available for use ? If so then using it to store new value as well as updating array index to accomodate this new change to maintain O(1) time read access? –  Dhwanit Aug 11 '13 at 22:31

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